dangermousie: (BSG: Kara/Anders by lyssie)
I have been very bad about replying to flister posts lately, my apologies. I do read every single post on my flist that is not a comm post. *note to self. be better about replying*

Anyway, we went to see two movies this weekend: The Simpsons Movie and Stardust. I loved both. Though if I never see another set of trailers as bad as the ones before TSM, I'll be a happy woman. People are annoyed at Tom Cruise for being a crazy scientologist, but my beef with him is his movie Jerry McGuire giving prominence to Cuba Gooding Jr., thus leading to movies like Daddy Day Camp.

The Simpsons Movie was hilarious. I don't remember last time I laughed so hard in the theater. And I've seen about three Simpsons eps total, in my life. And now, Spiderpig song is stuck in my head...

Stardust was simply lovely. It was a fairy tale for grown-ups, something that is very rare in Hollywood, though there are a number of lovely Russian movies in this genre. It was scary and funny and moving and colorful. Also, great cast and casting. Much as all the side characters were amazing and attention-grabbing, the two protagonists, Tristan the shopboy on a quest (Charlie Cox) and Yvaine the falling star (Claire Danes), never got lost in the shuffle. Also, (because it's me and I am bound to be shallow at regular intervals) Charlie Cox is hot once he learns to swashbuckle.



The story is about a 19th century English young man, Tristan, who crosses into the faerie realm of Stormhold, to bring back a fallen star in order to win the heart of the girl he is infatuated with. But when he finds her, the fallen star is actually a beautiful, lost (and snarky) young woman named Yvaine. And a number of unsavory individuals are after her, including a witch who wants to eat her still beating heart to restore her youth and a murderous royal family who want to settle the right of succession.

The whole thing is, on some level, like one of those Grimm fairytales. The original versions, with toes being cut off and eyes plucked out by pidgeons, not the Disneyfied versions. The faerie realm of Stormhold really is a wondrous place: a place full of wonders, some of which you might even survive.

Some stills from the movie. Not spoilery )

Brief spoilery comment )

Oh, and another awesome thing: the Chinese period martial arts drama Men and Legends, starring Peter Ho and Dylan Kuo (as [livejournal.com profile] calledinvain pointed out correctly, the Asian Heath Ledger and Orlando Bloom) is coming subbed to DVD on Aug 31. Yay.
dangermousie: (BSG: Kara/Anders by lyssie)
I have been very bad about replying to flister posts lately, my apologies. I do read every single post on my flist that is not a comm post. *note to self. be better about replying*

Anyway, we went to see two movies this weekend: The Simpsons Movie and Stardust. I loved both. Though if I never see another set of trailers as bad as the ones before TSM, I'll be a happy woman. People are annoyed at Tom Cruise for being a crazy scientologist, but my beef with him is his movie Jerry McGuire giving prominence to Cuba Gooding Jr., thus leading to movies like Daddy Day Camp.

The Simpsons Movie was hilarious. I don't remember last time I laughed so hard in the theater. And I've seen about three Simpsons eps total, in my life. And now, Spiderpig song is stuck in my head...

Stardust was simply lovely. It was a fairy tale for grown-ups, something that is very rare in Hollywood, though there are a number of lovely Russian movies in this genre. It was scary and funny and moving and colorful. Also, great cast and casting. Much as all the side characters were amazing and attention-grabbing, the two protagonists, Tristan the shopboy on a quest (Charlie Cox) and Yvaine the falling star (Claire Danes), never got lost in the shuffle. Also, (because it's me and I am bound to be shallow at regular intervals) Charlie Cox is hot once he learns to swashbuckle.



The story is about a 19th century English young man, Tristan, who crosses into the faerie realm of Stormhold, to bring back a fallen star in order to win the heart of the girl he is infatuated with. But when he finds her, the fallen star is actually a beautiful, lost (and snarky) young woman named Yvaine. And a number of unsavory individuals are after her, including a witch who wants to eat her still beating heart to restore her youth and a murderous royal family who want to settle the right of succession.

The whole thing is, on some level, like one of those Grimm fairytales. The original versions, with toes being cut off and eyes plucked out by pidgeons, not the Disneyfied versions. The faerie realm of Stormhold really is a wondrous place: a place full of wonders, some of which you might even survive.

Some stills from the movie. Not spoilery )

Brief spoilery comment )

Oh, and another awesome thing: the Chinese period martial arts drama Men and Legends, starring Peter Ho and Dylan Kuo (as [livejournal.com profile] calledinvain pointed out correctly, the Asian Heath Ledger and Orlando Bloom) is coming subbed to DVD on Aug 31. Yay.
dangermousie: (BSG: Kara/Anders by lyssie)
I have been very bad about replying to flister posts lately, my apologies. I do read every single post on my flist that is not a comm post. *note to self. be better about replying*

Anyway, we went to see two movies this weekend: The Simpsons Movie and Stardust. I loved both. Though if I never see another set of trailers as bad as the ones before TSM, I'll be a happy woman. People are annoyed at Tom Cruise for being a crazy scientologist, but my beef with him is his movie Jerry McGuire giving prominence to Cuba Gooding Jr., thus leading to movies like Daddy Day Camp.

The Simpsons Movie was hilarious. I don't remember last time I laughed so hard in the theater. And I've seen about three Simpsons eps total, in my life. And now, Spiderpig song is stuck in my head...

Stardust was simply lovely. It was a fairy tale for grown-ups, something that is very rare in Hollywood, though there are a number of lovely Russian movies in this genre. It was scary and funny and moving and colorful. Also, great cast and casting. Much as all the side characters were amazing and attention-grabbing, the two protagonists, Tristan the shopboy on a quest (Charlie Cox) and Yvaine the falling star (Claire Danes), never got lost in the shuffle. Also, (because it's me and I am bound to be shallow at regular intervals) Charlie Cox is hot once he learns to swashbuckle.



The story is about a 19th century English young man, Tristan, who crosses into the faerie realm of Stormhold, to bring back a fallen star in order to win the heart of the girl he is infatuated with. But when he finds her, the fallen star is actually a beautiful, lost (and snarky) young woman named Yvaine. And a number of unsavory individuals are after her, including a witch who wants to eat her still beating heart to restore her youth and a murderous royal family who want to settle the right of succession.

The whole thing is, on some level, like one of those Grimm fairytales. The original versions, with toes being cut off and eyes plucked out by pidgeons, not the Disneyfied versions. The faerie realm of Stormhold really is a wondrous place: a place full of wonders, some of which you might even survive.

Some stills from the movie. Not spoilery )

Brief spoilery comment )

Oh, and another awesome thing: the Chinese period martial arts drama Men and Legends, starring Peter Ho and Dylan Kuo (as [livejournal.com profile] calledinvain pointed out correctly, the Asian Heath Ledger and Orlando Bloom) is coming subbed to DVD on Aug 31. Yay.
dangermousie: (Bond by svilleficrecs)
I promise to get to all the comments.

Mr. Mousie and I just returned from the Irish film The Wind that Shakes the Barley (Synopsis and pictures posted in this entry). I could meta about it all day (and plan to, tomorrow), but it's late now so all I will say it is blew me away.

It's the best movie I've seen this year, and probably last year too. It's complicated and complex and deceptively laid back yet incredibly emotionally powerful. I wanted to look away in spots but couldn't.

And all this effect was on someone who knows little if any Irish history.

Go watch.

Now.

And because I cannot completely throw off the shallow? Padraic Delaney who plays Teddy is gorgeous. (So is Cillian Murphy who plays Damien but he is not my type).
dangermousie: (Bond by svilleficrecs)
I promise to get to all the comments.

Mr. Mousie and I just returned from the Irish film The Wind that Shakes the Barley (Synopsis and pictures posted in this entry). I could meta about it all day (and plan to, tomorrow), but it's late now so all I will say it is blew me away.

It's the best movie I've seen this year, and probably last year too. It's complicated and complex and deceptively laid back yet incredibly emotionally powerful. I wanted to look away in spots but couldn't.

And all this effect was on someone who knows little if any Irish history.

Go watch.

Now.

And because I cannot completely throw off the shallow? Padraic Delaney who plays Teddy is gorgeous. (So is Cillian Murphy who plays Damien but he is not my type).
dangermousie: (Bond by svilleficrecs)
I promise to get to all the comments.

Mr. Mousie and I just returned from the Irish film The Wind that Shakes the Barley (Synopsis and pictures posted in this entry). I could meta about it all day (and plan to, tomorrow), but it's late now so all I will say it is blew me away.

It's the best movie I've seen this year, and probably last year too. It's complicated and complex and deceptively laid back yet incredibly emotionally powerful. I wanted to look away in spots but couldn't.

And all this effect was on someone who knows little if any Irish history.

Go watch.

Now.

And because I cannot completely throw off the shallow? Padraic Delaney who plays Teddy is gorgeous. (So is Cillian Murphy who plays Damien but he is not my type).
dangermousie: (Bond by svilleficrecs)
Yesterday, I went and saw Amazing Grace, a movie about William Wilberforce, a British Parliamentarian who fought for (and got passed) the 1807 Abolition of Slave Trade Act. The movie stars Ioan Gruffudd as Wilberforce, who was a very young politician, in his early 20s when elected to Parliament, and who was apparently quite the idealistic cause-head, fighting his whole life against slavery, for prison reform, and the founder of the Society Against Cruelty to Animals.

It’s a good movie, well-acted, well-put-together, and it’s actually startling and refreshing to be reminded that yes, someone like that was a real person, and there are idealists in politics, it’s not all about sordidness and money-grubbing. Apparently, WW was a close friend of William Pitt the Younger, at 24 the youngest Prime Minister in British history (Pitt and Wilberforce were college friends) and I was all excited to see Pitt in the movie (looking hot, I might add). It’s also awesome to see intelligent and energetic real life politicians.

And hey, they had Charles James Fox (as he was one of WW’s supporters despite being in a different political party) in the movie too, and ever since reading The Aristocrats by Stella Tillyard, a biography of the Richmond sisters (one of whom was his mother), I’ve been rather interested in him. I also read a book “The harlot and the statesman: The story of Elizabeth Armistead & Charles James Fox,” by I.M. Davis in college, and it was a biography of Elizabeth Armistead, Fox’s wife, as Fox quite unusually (and very awesomely) married a professional courtesan. Woo-hoo for him!

Anyway, I am going to go looking for some books on Wilberforce and Pitt. Any recs? The funny thing is, I came across a novel about Pitt a long time ago, and I only read the beginning but it’s now bugging me as to what it was. Any ideas? Any clue as to where I might look?

In any event, I want some non-fiction books about them. What are good ones? I am going to get William Hague’s William Pitt the Younger, not just because it seems the easiest to find, but also because it seems good, but any other ones? I actually really enjoy non-fiction books about politics, so if there are any recs for any such for British politics in 17th-19th centuries, do rec!

And in unrelated but historical-book news, I started reading The Disappearing Duke: The Improbable Tale of an Eccentric English Family
by Andrew Crofts and it is craaaaazy.
dangermousie: (Bond by svilleficrecs)
Yesterday, I went and saw Amazing Grace, a movie about William Wilberforce, a British Parliamentarian who fought for (and got passed) the 1807 Abolition of Slave Trade Act. The movie stars Ioan Gruffudd as Wilberforce, who was a very young politician, in his early 20s when elected to Parliament, and who was apparently quite the idealistic cause-head, fighting his whole life against slavery, for prison reform, and the founder of the Society Against Cruelty to Animals.

It’s a good movie, well-acted, well-put-together, and it’s actually startling and refreshing to be reminded that yes, someone like that was a real person, and there are idealists in politics, it’s not all about sordidness and money-grubbing. Apparently, WW was a close friend of William Pitt the Younger, at 24 the youngest Prime Minister in British history (Pitt and Wilberforce were college friends) and I was all excited to see Pitt in the movie (looking hot, I might add). It’s also awesome to see intelligent and energetic real life politicians.

And hey, they had Charles James Fox (as he was one of WW’s supporters despite being in a different political party) in the movie too, and ever since reading The Aristocrats by Stella Tillyard, a biography of the Richmond sisters (one of whom was his mother), I’ve been rather interested in him. I also read a book “The harlot and the statesman: The story of Elizabeth Armistead & Charles James Fox,” by I.M. Davis in college, and it was a biography of Elizabeth Armistead, Fox’s wife, as Fox quite unusually (and very awesomely) married a professional courtesan. Woo-hoo for him!

Anyway, I am going to go looking for some books on Wilberforce and Pitt. Any recs? The funny thing is, I came across a novel about Pitt a long time ago, and I only read the beginning but it’s now bugging me as to what it was. Any ideas? Any clue as to where I might look?

In any event, I want some non-fiction books about them. What are good ones? I am going to get William Hague’s William Pitt the Younger, not just because it seems the easiest to find, but also because it seems good, but any other ones? I actually really enjoy non-fiction books about politics, so if there are any recs for any such for British politics in 17th-19th centuries, do rec!

And in unrelated but historical-book news, I started reading The Disappearing Duke: The Improbable Tale of an Eccentric English Family
by Andrew Crofts and it is craaaaazy.
dangermousie: (Bond by svilleficrecs)
Yesterday, I went and saw Amazing Grace, a movie about William Wilberforce, a British Parliamentarian who fought for (and got passed) the 1807 Abolition of Slave Trade Act. The movie stars Ioan Gruffudd as Wilberforce, who was a very young politician, in his early 20s when elected to Parliament, and who was apparently quite the idealistic cause-head, fighting his whole life against slavery, for prison reform, and the founder of the Society Against Cruelty to Animals.

It’s a good movie, well-acted, well-put-together, and it’s actually startling and refreshing to be reminded that yes, someone like that was a real person, and there are idealists in politics, it’s not all about sordidness and money-grubbing. Apparently, WW was a close friend of William Pitt the Younger, at 24 the youngest Prime Minister in British history (Pitt and Wilberforce were college friends) and I was all excited to see Pitt in the movie (looking hot, I might add). It’s also awesome to see intelligent and energetic real life politicians.

And hey, they had Charles James Fox (as he was one of WW’s supporters despite being in a different political party) in the movie too, and ever since reading The Aristocrats by Stella Tillyard, a biography of the Richmond sisters (one of whom was his mother), I’ve been rather interested in him. I also read a book “The harlot and the statesman: The story of Elizabeth Armistead & Charles James Fox,” by I.M. Davis in college, and it was a biography of Elizabeth Armistead, Fox’s wife, as Fox quite unusually (and very awesomely) married a professional courtesan. Woo-hoo for him!

Anyway, I am going to go looking for some books on Wilberforce and Pitt. Any recs? The funny thing is, I came across a novel about Pitt a long time ago, and I only read the beginning but it’s now bugging me as to what it was. Any ideas? Any clue as to where I might look?

In any event, I want some non-fiction books about them. What are good ones? I am going to get William Hague’s William Pitt the Younger, not just because it seems the easiest to find, but also because it seems good, but any other ones? I actually really enjoy non-fiction books about politics, so if there are any recs for any such for British politics in 17th-19th centuries, do rec!

And in unrelated but historical-book news, I started reading The Disappearing Duke: The Improbable Tale of an Eccentric English Family
by Andrew Crofts and it is craaaaazy.

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