dangermousie: (Dhoom 2)
Today’s recommended random movie is Mili, a seventies ‘slice of realism’ romance from Bollywood, starring one of my all-time favorite movie couples, Amitabh Bachchan and Jaya Bhaduri (who did eventually get married and produce Abhishek Bachchan, yum).

I don’t know why I love it so. It has only two songs (both OK, but neither memorable), it doesn’t have glamorous settings (it is all filmed in and around one middle-class hi-rise building) and has no long-lost siblings, evil parents, or crazy vengeance seeking nuns (if you know the movie that has the latter, let me know).

Neither of the leads is portrayed as at all glamorous. Jaya always had a more every-day beauty, and here, dressed in strictly average clothes, no glam make-up, she literally is and looks like the girl next door. Amitabh has certainly worn snazzy and eye-popping seventies clothes, but here, once again, he is dressed entirely unremarkably.

And the movie is severely lacking in melodrama. It’s rather startlingly low-key. And yet, it made me cry and cry. Probably precisely because of all of the above.

The plot of it is pretty simple (and would be OK in a dorama). It’s about two damaged people who find love with each other. Or do they?

Mili (played by Jaya) is a cheerful, sunny girl living with her aunt and uncle in one of the many apartments in the hi-rise. She is (as all sunny cheerful girls) suffering from a potentially terminal illness, cancer. She doesn’t really talk about it and there are no gigantic melodramatic scenes about it, but there is one moving, understated scene of her freaking out.

Shekhar (played by Amitabh) is a rather wealthy young man who has just moved into the penthouse and has no desire to interact with his neighbors. In a way, it’s a pre-emptive measure. Shekhar is a borderline alcoholic who’s been living all his life under the shadow of the fact that when he was a child, his father killed his mother for infidelity and then hung himself (or was hanged, I don’t remember). Not just a traumatic event, in as family-oriented, socially conservative society as he is in, this is a stigma that pursues him every day.

Mili and Shekhar meet in a confrontational fashion so beloved of many dramas: he refuses to allow the building’s kids to play on his balcony the way they used to and she comes to ask for the favor, and the delight of the movie is the slow progress of their relationship. This movie is startlingly one-track. It doesn’t really deviate from the development of trust and love between Mili and Shekhar (she is moved by his isolation but she is no one’s weakling fool, and he is desperate to open up to someone but is too guarded to do so easily). Jaya and Amitabh have awesome chemistry and while Amitabh never was known for portraying romantic leads, he is wonderful in this movie: all wounded, and young, and ultimately, wonderfully romantic.

The little touches of the other characters (the gossipy neighbors, Mili’s brother etc) also add touches of every-dayness to the story.

I cannot recommend this highly enough.

My favorite scenes are behind the cut and so are spoilery comments )

On the other end of the spectrum is Hera Pheri, a 1976 film which I have but haven’t seen yet.

However, after reading the following review from Bollybob’s cite, I simply must.

Vijay's goal in life is to use an ancient and proven technique for curing lunatics: laying the severed head of a murderer between her feet. )
dangermousie: (Dhoom 2)
Today’s recommended random movie is Mili, a seventies ‘slice of realism’ romance from Bollywood, starring one of my all-time favorite movie couples, Amitabh Bachchan and Jaya Bhaduri (who did eventually get married and produce Abhishek Bachchan, yum).

I don’t know why I love it so. It has only two songs (both OK, but neither memorable), it doesn’t have glamorous settings (it is all filmed in and around one middle-class hi-rise building) and has no long-lost siblings, evil parents, or crazy vengeance seeking nuns (if you know the movie that has the latter, let me know).

Neither of the leads is portrayed as at all glamorous. Jaya always had a more every-day beauty, and here, dressed in strictly average clothes, no glam make-up, she literally is and looks like the girl next door. Amitabh has certainly worn snazzy and eye-popping seventies clothes, but here, once again, he is dressed entirely unremarkably.

And the movie is severely lacking in melodrama. It’s rather startlingly low-key. And yet, it made me cry and cry. Probably precisely because of all of the above.

The plot of it is pretty simple (and would be OK in a dorama). It’s about two damaged people who find love with each other. Or do they?

Mili (played by Jaya) is a cheerful, sunny girl living with her aunt and uncle in one of the many apartments in the hi-rise. She is (as all sunny cheerful girls) suffering from a potentially terminal illness, cancer. She doesn’t really talk about it and there are no gigantic melodramatic scenes about it, but there is one moving, understated scene of her freaking out.

Shekhar (played by Amitabh) is a rather wealthy young man who has just moved into the penthouse and has no desire to interact with his neighbors. In a way, it’s a pre-emptive measure. Shekhar is a borderline alcoholic who’s been living all his life under the shadow of the fact that when he was a child, his father killed his mother for infidelity and then hung himself (or was hanged, I don’t remember). Not just a traumatic event, in as family-oriented, socially conservative society as he is in, this is a stigma that pursues him every day.

Mili and Shekhar meet in a confrontational fashion so beloved of many dramas: he refuses to allow the building’s kids to play on his balcony the way they used to and she comes to ask for the favor, and the delight of the movie is the slow progress of their relationship. This movie is startlingly one-track. It doesn’t really deviate from the development of trust and love between Mili and Shekhar (she is moved by his isolation but she is no one’s weakling fool, and he is desperate to open up to someone but is too guarded to do so easily). Jaya and Amitabh have awesome chemistry and while Amitabh never was known for portraying romantic leads, he is wonderful in this movie: all wounded, and young, and ultimately, wonderfully romantic.

The little touches of the other characters (the gossipy neighbors, Mili’s brother etc) also add touches of every-dayness to the story.

I cannot recommend this highly enough.

My favorite scenes are behind the cut and so are spoilery comments )

On the other end of the spectrum is Hera Pheri, a 1976 film which I have but haven’t seen yet.

However, after reading the following review from Bollybob’s cite, I simply must.

Vijay's goal in life is to use an ancient and proven technique for curing lunatics: laying the severed head of a murderer between her feet. )
dangermousie: (Dhoom 2)
Today’s recommended random movie is Mili, a seventies ‘slice of realism’ romance from Bollywood, starring one of my all-time favorite movie couples, Amitabh Bachchan and Jaya Bhaduri (who did eventually get married and produce Abhishek Bachchan, yum).

I don’t know why I love it so. It has only two songs (both OK, but neither memorable), it doesn’t have glamorous settings (it is all filmed in and around one middle-class hi-rise building) and has no long-lost siblings, evil parents, or crazy vengeance seeking nuns (if you know the movie that has the latter, let me know).

Neither of the leads is portrayed as at all glamorous. Jaya always had a more every-day beauty, and here, dressed in strictly average clothes, no glam make-up, she literally is and looks like the girl next door. Amitabh has certainly worn snazzy and eye-popping seventies clothes, but here, once again, he is dressed entirely unremarkably.

And the movie is severely lacking in melodrama. It’s rather startlingly low-key. And yet, it made me cry and cry. Probably precisely because of all of the above.

The plot of it is pretty simple (and would be OK in a dorama). It’s about two damaged people who find love with each other. Or do they?

Mili (played by Jaya) is a cheerful, sunny girl living with her aunt and uncle in one of the many apartments in the hi-rise. She is (as all sunny cheerful girls) suffering from a potentially terminal illness, cancer. She doesn’t really talk about it and there are no gigantic melodramatic scenes about it, but there is one moving, understated scene of her freaking out.

Shekhar (played by Amitabh) is a rather wealthy young man who has just moved into the penthouse and has no desire to interact with his neighbors. In a way, it’s a pre-emptive measure. Shekhar is a borderline alcoholic who’s been living all his life under the shadow of the fact that when he was a child, his father killed his mother for infidelity and then hung himself (or was hanged, I don’t remember). Not just a traumatic event, in as family-oriented, socially conservative society as he is in, this is a stigma that pursues him every day.

Mili and Shekhar meet in a confrontational fashion so beloved of many dramas: he refuses to allow the building’s kids to play on his balcony the way they used to and she comes to ask for the favor, and the delight of the movie is the slow progress of their relationship. This movie is startlingly one-track. It doesn’t really deviate from the development of trust and love between Mili and Shekhar (she is moved by his isolation but she is no one’s weakling fool, and he is desperate to open up to someone but is too guarded to do so easily). Jaya and Amitabh have awesome chemistry and while Amitabh never was known for portraying romantic leads, he is wonderful in this movie: all wounded, and young, and ultimately, wonderfully romantic.

The little touches of the other characters (the gossipy neighbors, Mili’s brother etc) also add touches of every-dayness to the story.

I cannot recommend this highly enough.

My favorite scenes are behind the cut and so are spoilery comments )

On the other end of the spectrum is Hera Pheri, a 1976 film which I have but haven’t seen yet.

However, after reading the following review from Bollybob’s cite, I simply must.

Vijay's goal in life is to use an ancient and proven technique for curing lunatics: laying the severed head of a murderer between her feet. )

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