dangermousie: (Default)
Most of my grown-up fictional tastes can be explained by the fact that growing up I devoured Alexandre Dumas and Russian musicals. Doomed love, men with swords, melodrama, and things that never end well - yeah, that's where I got it all.

And you know what's best? When you combine Dumas and Russian musicals - no wonder that growing up, the Soviet musical film D'Artagnan and Three Musketeers was probably my favorite movie. When I was 10 or so, I probably knew every song in that movie by heart. I didn't know what a shipper was but I was definitely a shipper for D'Artagnan/Constance and Anne/Buckingham (even more so for the latter - now that I think about it, it's scary to think how my shipping preferences have been influenced by childhood devouring of Dumas - between St. Luc/Jeanne, Bussy/Diane, and La Mole/Margot, that's my ship types right there. Good Lord. That's totally my source for tough fighting men and women they worship thing I have going, with a dose of dysfunction thrown in. No wonder I love dysfunctional ships).

Anyway, that Soviet movie is something I am not really rational about - I can comprehend its flaws with my grown-up eyes but the child part of my brain will unquestioningly and blindly love it. Not to mention that I honestly do think that of all the adaptations I have seen (American and Russian - I have never seen a French one, though I do want to), it's the closest in spirit to the book.

Anyway, imagine my excitement when I found the songs on youtube.

Songs )

I really need to dig out my DVDs of the 1970s French mini of La Dame de Monsoreau, my favorite Dumas adaptation (Bussy was my earliest fictional crush. Oh, how I cried when he died).

OMG, youtubing, I've discovered there is a 2008 version. I need to get my hands on it - I know the book so backward and forward I don't need subs.



Hmmm, the old English translation of that novel is horrific - it's abridged and Victorianish. I wonder if there is a more modern one (I only read it in Russian). Ehhh, this book must have given Victorians fits anyway, the main OTP are adulterers as the heroine is married to another (Dumas is pretty careful to tell us she was forced into her hideous marriage but I doubt that would make Victorians feel any better) and the secondary OTP is lawfully married which a Victorian would approve except for the whole thing where the husband used to be one of Henri III's boyfriends and has no regrets about it. Ha!
dangermousie: (Default)
Most of my grown-up fictional tastes can be explained by the fact that growing up I devoured Alexandre Dumas and Russian musicals. Doomed love, men with swords, melodrama, and things that never end well - yeah, that's where I got it all.

And you know what's best? When you combine Dumas and Russian musicals - no wonder that growing up, the Soviet musical film D'Artagnan and Three Musketeers was probably my favorite movie. When I was 10 or so, I probably knew every song in that movie by heart. I didn't know what a shipper was but I was definitely a shipper for D'Artagnan/Constance and Anne/Buckingham (even more so for the latter - now that I think about it, it's scary to think how my shipping preferences have been influenced by childhood devouring of Dumas - between St. Luc/Jeanne, Bussy/Diane, and La Mole/Margot, that's my ship types right there. Good Lord. That's totally my source for tough fighting men and women they worship thing I have going, with a dose of dysfunction thrown in. No wonder I love dysfunctional ships).

Anyway, that Soviet movie is something I am not really rational about - I can comprehend its flaws with my grown-up eyes but the child part of my brain will unquestioningly and blindly love it. Not to mention that I honestly do think that of all the adaptations I have seen (American and Russian - I have never seen a French one, though I do want to), it's the closest in spirit to the book.

Anyway, imagine my excitement when I found the songs on youtube.

Songs )

I really need to dig out my DVDs of the 1970s French mini of La Dame de Monsoreau, my favorite Dumas adaptation (Bussy was my earliest fictional crush. Oh, how I cried when he died).

OMG, youtubing, I've discovered there is a 2008 version. I need to get my hands on it - I know the book so backward and forward I don't need subs.



Hmmm, the old English translation of that novel is horrific - it's abridged and Victorianish. I wonder if there is a more modern one (I only read it in Russian). Ehhh, this book must have given Victorians fits anyway, the main OTP are adulterers as the heroine is married to another (Dumas is pretty careful to tell us she was forced into her hideous marriage but I doubt that would make Victorians feel any better) and the secondary OTP is lawfully married which a Victorian would approve except for the whole thing where the husband used to be one of Henri III's boyfriends and has no regrets about it. Ha!
dangermousie: (Default)
Most of my grown-up fictional tastes can be explained by the fact that growing up I devoured Alexandre Dumas and Russian musicals. Doomed love, men with swords, melodrama, and things that never end well - yeah, that's where I got it all.

And you know what's best? When you combine Dumas and Russian musicals - no wonder that growing up, the Soviet musical film D'Artagnan and Three Musketeers was probably my favorite movie. When I was 10 or so, I probably knew every song in that movie by heart. I didn't know what a shipper was but I was definitely a shipper for D'Artagnan/Constance and Anne/Buckingham (even more so for the latter - now that I think about it, it's scary to think how my shipping preferences have been influenced by childhood devouring of Dumas - between St. Luc/Jeanne, Bussy/Diane, and La Mole/Margot, that's my ship types right there. Good Lord. That's totally my source for tough fighting men and women they worship thing I have going, with a dose of dysfunction thrown in. No wonder I love dysfunctional ships).

Anyway, that Soviet movie is something I am not really rational about - I can comprehend its flaws with my grown-up eyes but the child part of my brain will unquestioningly and blindly love it. Not to mention that I honestly do think that of all the adaptations I have seen (American and Russian - I have never seen a French one, though I do want to), it's the closest in spirit to the book.

Anyway, imagine my excitement when I found the songs on youtube.

Songs )

I really need to dig out my DVDs of the 1970s French mini of La Dame de Monsoreau, my favorite Dumas adaptation (Bussy was my earliest fictional crush. Oh, how I cried when he died).

OMG, youtubing, I've discovered there is a 2008 version. I need to get my hands on it - I know the book so backward and forward I don't need subs.



Hmmm, the old English translation of that novel is horrific - it's abridged and Victorianish. I wonder if there is a more modern one (I only read it in Russian). Ehhh, this book must have given Victorians fits anyway, the main OTP are adulterers as the heroine is married to another (Dumas is pretty careful to tell us she was forced into her hideous marriage but I doubt that would make Victorians feel any better) and the secondary OTP is lawfully married which a Victorian would approve except for the whole thing where the husband used to be one of Henri III's boyfriends and has no regrets about it. Ha!
dangermousie: (Default)
A nifty little Across the Universe picture to start with:



Seriously, the movie was delightful, but more than anything, it made me want to own every Beatles CD ever.

And in other movie news, I just received from Netflix, my DVD of Ryan’s Daughter, David Lean’s controversial 1970 movie. Considering that Lawrence of Arabia is my favorite movie, if I had to ever pick one (seeing it in a movie theater when they had a limited re-release was amazing), that I think Bridge on the River Kwai is one of the best movies I’ve seen, and I have even managed to enjoy Doctor Zhivago despite being from the former USSR, I had good hopes for it, which were quite realized. Haven’t finished it yet though.

RD has the requisite doomed love affair, beautiful cinematography, and gorgeous performances (it was apparently nominated for a slew of Oscars). The story is set in a remote part of Ireland at 1916. Rosy Ryan (Sarah Miles) is a naïve, spirited young woman who wants more than what her life has given her. Rosy is trapped in a loveless marriage to a much older man (Robert Mitchum) and equally trapped in her harsh, closed-off community, where the main occupations are hating the British and picking on the local halfwit (played by John Miles, who got an Oscar for the role). Temporarily, her life is made shiny when she notices the newly arrived British officer, Randolph Doryan (Christopher Jones). The shell-shocked, recovering from horrors of the war Doryan and Rosy fall into passionate love (or maybe it’s desperation, and physical compatibility, you decide). But of course, this is quite doomed. Not just because Rosy is a married woman in a puritanical land, but because Doryan is a British officer, something that is akin to a leper to the staunchly nationalistic villagers. When an incident happens, the villagers begin to look for a traitor in their midst and…

I promise to screencap shortly. Let me just say, on a very shallow front, that Christopher Jones as the Edwardian, upper-class, messed-in-the-head war hero is HOT.

Also, I just realized that the 1970s French adaptation of La Dame De Monsoreau actually gives some hope for a happy ending for Bussy and Diane! (!!!!!) As opposed to the total bleakness of the novel, where he survives the fight with the assassin squad, only to be killed by his patron and ‘friend,’ and she goes insane and disappears.

Ramble ramble )

Oh, and last but not least, here are the newbie stars of the upcoming Saawariya, Ranbir Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor (no relation). The whole thing is supposed be a loose interpretation of Dostoyevsky’s White Nights (!!!!!)

They look adorable:

Cut for size )
dangermousie: (Default)
A nifty little Across the Universe picture to start with:



Seriously, the movie was delightful, but more than anything, it made me want to own every Beatles CD ever.

And in other movie news, I just received from Netflix, my DVD of Ryan’s Daughter, David Lean’s controversial 1970 movie. Considering that Lawrence of Arabia is my favorite movie, if I had to ever pick one (seeing it in a movie theater when they had a limited re-release was amazing), that I think Bridge on the River Kwai is one of the best movies I’ve seen, and I have even managed to enjoy Doctor Zhivago despite being from the former USSR, I had good hopes for it, which were quite realized. Haven’t finished it yet though.

RD has the requisite doomed love affair, beautiful cinematography, and gorgeous performances (it was apparently nominated for a slew of Oscars). The story is set in a remote part of Ireland at 1916. Rosy Ryan (Sarah Miles) is a naïve, spirited young woman who wants more than what her life has given her. Rosy is trapped in a loveless marriage to a much older man (Robert Mitchum) and equally trapped in her harsh, closed-off community, where the main occupations are hating the British and picking on the local halfwit (played by John Miles, who got an Oscar for the role). Temporarily, her life is made shiny when she notices the newly arrived British officer, Randolph Doryan (Christopher Jones). The shell-shocked, recovering from horrors of the war Doryan and Rosy fall into passionate love (or maybe it’s desperation, and physical compatibility, you decide). But of course, this is quite doomed. Not just because Rosy is a married woman in a puritanical land, but because Doryan is a British officer, something that is akin to a leper to the staunchly nationalistic villagers. When an incident happens, the villagers begin to look for a traitor in their midst and…

I promise to screencap shortly. Let me just say, on a very shallow front, that Christopher Jones as the Edwardian, upper-class, messed-in-the-head war hero is HOT.

Also, I just realized that the 1970s French adaptation of La Dame De Monsoreau actually gives some hope for a happy ending for Bussy and Diane! (!!!!!) As opposed to the total bleakness of the novel, where he survives the fight with the assassin squad, only to be killed by his patron and ‘friend,’ and she goes insane and disappears.

Ramble ramble )

Oh, and last but not least, here are the newbie stars of the upcoming Saawariya, Ranbir Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor (no relation). The whole thing is supposed be a loose interpretation of Dostoyevsky’s White Nights (!!!!!)

They look adorable:

Cut for size )
dangermousie: (Default)
A nifty little Across the Universe picture to start with:



Seriously, the movie was delightful, but more than anything, it made me want to own every Beatles CD ever.

And in other movie news, I just received from Netflix, my DVD of Ryan’s Daughter, David Lean’s controversial 1970 movie. Considering that Lawrence of Arabia is my favorite movie, if I had to ever pick one (seeing it in a movie theater when they had a limited re-release was amazing), that I think Bridge on the River Kwai is one of the best movies I’ve seen, and I have even managed to enjoy Doctor Zhivago despite being from the former USSR, I had good hopes for it, which were quite realized. Haven’t finished it yet though.

RD has the requisite doomed love affair, beautiful cinematography, and gorgeous performances (it was apparently nominated for a slew of Oscars). The story is set in a remote part of Ireland at 1916. Rosy Ryan (Sarah Miles) is a naïve, spirited young woman who wants more than what her life has given her. Rosy is trapped in a loveless marriage to a much older man (Robert Mitchum) and equally trapped in her harsh, closed-off community, where the main occupations are hating the British and picking on the local halfwit (played by John Miles, who got an Oscar for the role). Temporarily, her life is made shiny when she notices the newly arrived British officer, Randolph Doryan (Christopher Jones). The shell-shocked, recovering from horrors of the war Doryan and Rosy fall into passionate love (or maybe it’s desperation, and physical compatibility, you decide). But of course, this is quite doomed. Not just because Rosy is a married woman in a puritanical land, but because Doryan is a British officer, something that is akin to a leper to the staunchly nationalistic villagers. When an incident happens, the villagers begin to look for a traitor in their midst and…

I promise to screencap shortly. Let me just say, on a very shallow front, that Christopher Jones as the Edwardian, upper-class, messed-in-the-head war hero is HOT.

Also, I just realized that the 1970s French adaptation of La Dame De Monsoreau actually gives some hope for a happy ending for Bussy and Diane! (!!!!!) As opposed to the total bleakness of the novel, where he survives the fight with the assassin squad, only to be killed by his patron and ‘friend,’ and she goes insane and disappears.

Ramble ramble )

Oh, and last but not least, here are the newbie stars of the upcoming Saawariya, Ranbir Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor (no relation). The whole thing is supposed be a loose interpretation of Dostoyevsky’s White Nights (!!!!!)

They look adorable:

Cut for size )

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