dangermousie: (Default)
OhmyGod ohmyGod ohmyGod!

There is an actual ‘Vote Saxon’ webpage:

http://www.votesaxon.co.uk/

I think I have died of glee.

In other news, I recently ended up watching the movie adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s ‘Jude the Obscure’ (the movie abbreviates the title to ‘Jude’) with Christopher Eccleston and Kate Winslet. I love Thomas Hardy. Jude is his last novel and makes Tess of the D’Urbervilles seem light and fluffy but it's just so beautiful and passionate and tragic, and the movie is a great adaptation of the novel.



Plot: The story centers around Jude (Christopher Eccleston) and Sue (Kate Winslet) whose love is enduring but doomed. Jude is a sensitive, intellectual and emotional man trapped in a brutal life (aka a typical Hardy character). He is a stone-mason whose dreams of education go up in smoke, and who ends up married to a loutish woman who tricks him into marriage. His life is bleak until he meets a cousin, Sue (Kate Winslet), free-spirited, intelligent, wonderful. They fall deeply in love, and really are meant for each other, but as they are married to other people, they end up ostracized by society, which has no place for the lovers, their children, or any hopes or dreams of theirs. This leads to unbelievable tragedy by the end.

Wonderful movie, though you keep waiting for doom (I read the book, but you don’t have to, to know it can’t end well), and then it comes. And breaks your heart to little pieces.

Trailer:

Trailer )

The ending is one of the most horrifying, depressing things imaginable. As a reviewer on amazon put it: I felt as though, three-quarters of the way through, without warning, someone had punched me in the gut, and then repeatedly kicked me until I died. Actually, the movie ends with more hope than the book, and that's really saying something. Think about the storyline this way: imagine the worst possible life that fate could lay out for you, and then multiple the pain factor by ten.

Yeah, that about sums it up.

Good movie though. Amazing, actually.

I love this MV of it:



That made me reread the book which is always a bad idea, as there is bawling.

But it's so beautifully written. One of my favorite scenes in all literature is Jude and Sue’s last meeting. Here it is, behind the cut.

Quotes )

I hate you Thomas Hardy. And love you. The novel is in public domain and is available on Gutenberg.net
dangermousie: (Default)
OhmyGod ohmyGod ohmyGod!

There is an actual ‘Vote Saxon’ webpage:

http://www.votesaxon.co.uk/

I think I have died of glee.

In other news, I recently ended up watching the movie adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s ‘Jude the Obscure’ (the movie abbreviates the title to ‘Jude’) with Christopher Eccleston and Kate Winslet. I love Thomas Hardy. Jude is his last novel and makes Tess of the D’Urbervilles seem light and fluffy but it's just so beautiful and passionate and tragic, and the movie is a great adaptation of the novel.



Plot: The story centers around Jude (Christopher Eccleston) and Sue (Kate Winslet) whose love is enduring but doomed. Jude is a sensitive, intellectual and emotional man trapped in a brutal life (aka a typical Hardy character). He is a stone-mason whose dreams of education go up in smoke, and who ends up married to a loutish woman who tricks him into marriage. His life is bleak until he meets a cousin, Sue (Kate Winslet), free-spirited, intelligent, wonderful. They fall deeply in love, and really are meant for each other, but as they are married to other people, they end up ostracized by society, which has no place for the lovers, their children, or any hopes or dreams of theirs. This leads to unbelievable tragedy by the end.

Wonderful movie, though you keep waiting for doom (I read the book, but you don’t have to, to know it can’t end well), and then it comes. And breaks your heart to little pieces.

Trailer:

Trailer )

The ending is one of the most horrifying, depressing things imaginable. As a reviewer on amazon put it: I felt as though, three-quarters of the way through, without warning, someone had punched me in the gut, and then repeatedly kicked me until I died. Actually, the movie ends with more hope than the book, and that's really saying something. Think about the storyline this way: imagine the worst possible life that fate could lay out for you, and then multiple the pain factor by ten.

Yeah, that about sums it up.

Good movie though. Amazing, actually.

I love this MV of it:



That made me reread the book which is always a bad idea, as there is bawling.

But it's so beautifully written. One of my favorite scenes in all literature is Jude and Sue’s last meeting. Here it is, behind the cut.

Quotes )

I hate you Thomas Hardy. And love you. The novel is in public domain and is available on Gutenberg.net
dangermousie: (Default)
OhmyGod ohmyGod ohmyGod!

There is an actual ‘Vote Saxon’ webpage:

http://www.votesaxon.co.uk/

I think I have died of glee.

In other news, I recently ended up watching the movie adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s ‘Jude the Obscure’ (the movie abbreviates the title to ‘Jude’) with Christopher Eccleston and Kate Winslet. I love Thomas Hardy. Jude is his last novel and makes Tess of the D’Urbervilles seem light and fluffy but it's just so beautiful and passionate and tragic, and the movie is a great adaptation of the novel.



Plot: The story centers around Jude (Christopher Eccleston) and Sue (Kate Winslet) whose love is enduring but doomed. Jude is a sensitive, intellectual and emotional man trapped in a brutal life (aka a typical Hardy character). He is a stone-mason whose dreams of education go up in smoke, and who ends up married to a loutish woman who tricks him into marriage. His life is bleak until he meets a cousin, Sue (Kate Winslet), free-spirited, intelligent, wonderful. They fall deeply in love, and really are meant for each other, but as they are married to other people, they end up ostracized by society, which has no place for the lovers, their children, or any hopes or dreams of theirs. This leads to unbelievable tragedy by the end.

Wonderful movie, though you keep waiting for doom (I read the book, but you don’t have to, to know it can’t end well), and then it comes. And breaks your heart to little pieces.

Trailer:

Trailer )

The ending is one of the most horrifying, depressing things imaginable. As a reviewer on amazon put it: I felt as though, three-quarters of the way through, without warning, someone had punched me in the gut, and then repeatedly kicked me until I died. Actually, the movie ends with more hope than the book, and that's really saying something. Think about the storyline this way: imagine the worst possible life that fate could lay out for you, and then multiple the pain factor by ten.

Yeah, that about sums it up.

Good movie though. Amazing, actually.

I love this MV of it:



That made me reread the book which is always a bad idea, as there is bawling.

But it's so beautifully written. One of my favorite scenes in all literature is Jude and Sue’s last meeting. Here it is, behind the cut.

Quotes )

I hate you Thomas Hardy. And love you. The novel is in public domain and is available on Gutenberg.net

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