dangermousie: (Default)
Today's book recommendation is one of my favorite novels and has been for a very long time:

Tereza Batista, Home from the Wars by the Brazillian author Jorge Amado (one of my favorite authors). It's my favorite one of all his novels, even over his two most famous works, Gabriela, Cloves and Cinammon (about a wild child woman's entry into a sleepy Bahia town in the 1920s and how it ends up changing the whole town) and Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (about the heroine's two very different marriages and the balance between the two).

Amado is one of my favorite authors and TB is my favorite of his books - so yes, it's rather a mad love on my part. I first read it when I was about 13 (in an expurgated Russian translation, with sex scenes removed) but as I have reread it through almost two decades since, my love for it has never diminished.

Also, those of you who crave women-centric stories? Strong heroines? Or just plain good writing? Enter here.

The novel employs a lopping, non-linear structure, with a series of flashbacks at its core. At the opening of the book Tereza is a successful retired prostitute, a leader of the informal hookers' union, and a woman nobody can control. The story snakes back and forth into her past, some of it incredibly horrific (this book is not for the faint of heart - child abuse, rape, and violence are all pretty graphic) but all of which builds her up instead of wrecking her - Tereza is one of my all-time favorite heroines because of how incredibly strong she is - she never submits. And yet the book is not grim misery either - there is love, and friendship, and hope, and beautiful beautiful prose the book is written in.

There is a love story woven in, too - Tereza's and a ship's captain's, set in the present, but if you are looking for a romance-centric book, look elsewhere. It's gorgeous, and hopeful, but purely secondary to other aspects.

Go read! Please?
dangermousie: (Default)
Today's book recommendation is one of my favorite novels and has been for a very long time:

Tereza Batista, Home from the Wars by the Brazillian author Jorge Amado (one of my favorite authors). It's my favorite one of all his novels, even over his two most famous works, Gabriela, Cloves and Cinammon (about a wild child woman's entry into a sleepy Bahia town in the 1920s and how it ends up changing the whole town) and Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (about the heroine's two very different marriages and the balance between the two).

Amado is one of my favorite authors and TB is my favorite of his books - so yes, it's rather a mad love on my part. I first read it when I was about 13 (in an expurgated Russian translation, with sex scenes removed) but as I have reread it through almost two decades since, my love for it has never diminished.

Also, those of you who crave women-centric stories? Strong heroines? Or just plain good writing? Enter here.

The novel employs a lopping, non-linear structure, with a series of flashbacks at its core. At the opening of the book Tereza is a successful retired prostitute, a leader of the informal hookers' union, and a woman nobody can control. The story snakes back and forth into her past, some of it incredibly horrific (this book is not for the faint of heart - child abuse, rape, and violence are all pretty graphic) but all of which builds her up instead of wrecking her - Tereza is one of my all-time favorite heroines because of how incredibly strong she is - she never submits. And yet the book is not grim misery either - there is love, and friendship, and hope, and beautiful beautiful prose the book is written in.

There is a love story woven in, too - Tereza's and a ship's captain's, set in the present, but if you are looking for a romance-centric book, look elsewhere. It's gorgeous, and hopeful, but purely secondary to other aspects.

Go read! Please?
dangermousie: (Default)
Today's book recommendation is one of my favorite novels and has been for a very long time:

Tereza Batista, Home from the Wars by the Brazillian author Jorge Amado (one of my favorite authors). It's my favorite one of all his novels, even over his two most famous works, Gabriela, Cloves and Cinammon (about a wild child woman's entry into a sleepy Bahia town in the 1920s and how it ends up changing the whole town) and Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (about the heroine's two very different marriages and the balance between the two).

Amado is one of my favorite authors and TB is my favorite of his books - so yes, it's rather a mad love on my part. I first read it when I was about 13 (in an expurgated Russian translation, with sex scenes removed) but as I have reread it through almost two decades since, my love for it has never diminished.

Also, those of you who crave women-centric stories? Strong heroines? Or just plain good writing? Enter here.

The novel employs a lopping, non-linear structure, with a series of flashbacks at its core. At the opening of the book Tereza is a successful retired prostitute, a leader of the informal hookers' union, and a woman nobody can control. The story snakes back and forth into her past, some of it incredibly horrific (this book is not for the faint of heart - child abuse, rape, and violence are all pretty graphic) but all of which builds her up instead of wrecking her - Tereza is one of my all-time favorite heroines because of how incredibly strong she is - she never submits. And yet the book is not grim misery either - there is love, and friendship, and hope, and beautiful beautiful prose the book is written in.

There is a love story woven in, too - Tereza's and a ship's captain's, set in the present, but if you are looking for a romance-centric book, look elsewhere. It's gorgeous, and hopeful, but purely secondary to other aspects.

Go read! Please?

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