dangermousie: (Default)
One of the things I always loved was Alfred Noyes' poem The Highwayman and Loreena McKennitt's song rendition of it...



I am not really in a drama mood right now...I kinda feel like digging out my Sir Walter Scott instead. No idea why, but I want something period and English. Maybe I'll finish Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton's Paul Clifford (which would make the most awesome mini - why are there nowhere near as many English period shows as are Korean ones?)
dangermousie: (Default)
One of the things I always loved was Alfred Noyes' poem The Highwayman and Loreena McKennitt's song rendition of it...



I am not really in a drama mood right now...I kinda feel like digging out my Sir Walter Scott instead. No idea why, but I want something period and English. Maybe I'll finish Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton's Paul Clifford (which would make the most awesome mini - why are there nowhere near as many English period shows as are Korean ones?)
dangermousie: (Default)
One of the things I always loved was Alfred Noyes' poem The Highwayman and Loreena McKennitt's song rendition of it...



I am not really in a drama mood right now...I kinda feel like digging out my Sir Walter Scott instead. No idea why, but I want something period and English. Maybe I'll finish Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton's Paul Clifford (which would make the most awesome mini - why are there nowhere near as many English period shows as are Korean ones?)
dangermousie: (Default)
Not caring about
The black disorder of my hair
I lay prostrate;
I ache with the loss
Of he who was first to caress it.

A poem by Izumi Shikibu, from 11th century, quoted in a section on Heian-era Kyoto, from John Dougill's Kyoto: A cultural history.
dangermousie: (Default)
Not caring about
The black disorder of my hair
I lay prostrate;
I ache with the loss
Of he who was first to caress it.

A poem by Izumi Shikibu, from 11th century, quoted in a section on Heian-era Kyoto, from John Dougill's Kyoto: A cultural history.
dangermousie: (Default)
Not caring about
The black disorder of my hair
I lay prostrate;
I ache with the loss
Of he who was first to caress it.

A poem by Izumi Shikibu, from 11th century, quoted in a section on Heian-era Kyoto, from John Dougill's Kyoto: A cultural history.
dangermousie: (Chuno - hands)
Head to hanjae's lj for more detail, but have you ever dreamed you are going to get Feng Shao Feng as Xiang Yu, Crystal Liu as Consort Yu, and Leon Lai as Liu Bang? Because you are getting it!!!!! In an upcoming movie White Vengeance? Oh, why is not in my hands already????

Oh, how hot and gorgeous will FSF/Crystal Liu be? OMG. And with battles and tragedy and costumes and...ummm, is it wrong to find Liu Bang sexy too? Because Leon Lai does it for me in a major way. ILY, Emperor Gaozu - ok, I felt v.v. weird even typing that.

Am extra amused because it means FSF gets to be Xiang Yu regardless of Yu Zheng's wishes in the matter.

Also, not that I am complaining - I am a majorly happy camper - but why the rash of Xiang Yu-Liu Bang movies/dramas lately? In addition to this and Yu Zheng's drama with Ming Dao, there is also an upcoming movie with Yang Mi (who is presumably portraying neither Xiang Yu nor Liu Bang), called Last Banquet (also as per my cstuff guru hanjae).

Let the best Xiang Yu win!!! :)

This is also an odd coincidence because I am currently reading Mark Edward Lewis' "The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han" and it has this hilarious (to me) passage about Liu Bang:

As a youth, Gaozu refused to work in his family's business and instead spent his time drinking and carousing with similarly inclined friends. During his rise to power, Gaozu even tried to throw his own children out of a carriage to aid his escape. When his father was taken prisoner by Xiang Yu and threatened with being boiled and eaten (DM: wtf? Boiled, fine, but why eaten? Surely they had some chickens or pigs), Gaozu asked to share the soup. After becoming emperor, he richly rewarded a follower who persuaded Gaozu's father (dm: guess they didn't eat him, after all) to serve as a subject in Gaozu's empire, since there could be only one sun in the sky.
Gaozu's lack of connection to his family (dm: worthy husband of Lu Zhi, it seems) and place of origin stands in stark contrast with that of his chief rival, Xiang Yu...Advised that, having occupied and sacked the Qin capital, he should make his own capital there, Xiang Yu insteasd chose to return to Chu, rule in his home, and enfeoff his allies across the north of China. "To become rich and famous and then not go back to your old home is like putting on an embroidered coat and going out walking in the night. Who would know about it?" (Dm: my fear in walking in fancy clothes at night would be getting mugged, not unnoticed, but then am not fearsome hegemon-king). He could not leave his old home for the sake of an empire. Gaozu could, and so he triumphed."

I wish I could find an entire book in English on Liu Bang and Xiang Yu's struggle. Would be fascinating. Oh well.
dangermousie: (Chuno - hands)
Head to hanjae's lj for more detail, but have you ever dreamed you are going to get Feng Shao Feng as Xiang Yu, Crystal Liu as Consort Yu, and Leon Lai as Liu Bang? Because you are getting it!!!!! In an upcoming movie White Vengeance? Oh, why is not in my hands already????

Oh, how hot and gorgeous will FSF/Crystal Liu be? OMG. And with battles and tragedy and costumes and...ummm, is it wrong to find Liu Bang sexy too? Because Leon Lai does it for me in a major way. ILY, Emperor Gaozu - ok, I felt v.v. weird even typing that.

Am extra amused because it means FSF gets to be Xiang Yu regardless of Yu Zheng's wishes in the matter.

Also, not that I am complaining - I am a majorly happy camper - but why the rash of Xiang Yu-Liu Bang movies/dramas lately? In addition to this and Yu Zheng's drama with Ming Dao, there is also an upcoming movie with Yang Mi (who is presumably portraying neither Xiang Yu nor Liu Bang), called Last Banquet (also as per my cstuff guru hanjae).

Let the best Xiang Yu win!!! :)

This is also an odd coincidence because I am currently reading Mark Edward Lewis' "The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han" and it has this hilarious (to me) passage about Liu Bang:

As a youth, Gaozu refused to work in his family's business and instead spent his time drinking and carousing with similarly inclined friends. During his rise to power, Gaozu even tried to throw his own children out of a carriage to aid his escape. When his father was taken prisoner by Xiang Yu and threatened with being boiled and eaten (DM: wtf? Boiled, fine, but why eaten? Surely they had some chickens or pigs), Gaozu asked to share the soup. After becoming emperor, he richly rewarded a follower who persuaded Gaozu's father (dm: guess they didn't eat him, after all) to serve as a subject in Gaozu's empire, since there could be only one sun in the sky.
Gaozu's lack of connection to his family (dm: worthy husband of Lu Zhi, it seems) and place of origin stands in stark contrast with that of his chief rival, Xiang Yu...Advised that, having occupied and sacked the Qin capital, he should make his own capital there, Xiang Yu insteasd chose to return to Chu, rule in his home, and enfeoff his allies across the north of China. "To become rich and famous and then not go back to your old home is like putting on an embroidered coat and going out walking in the night. Who would know about it?" (Dm: my fear in walking in fancy clothes at night would be getting mugged, not unnoticed, but then am not fearsome hegemon-king). He could not leave his old home for the sake of an empire. Gaozu could, and so he triumphed."

I wish I could find an entire book in English on Liu Bang and Xiang Yu's struggle. Would be fascinating. Oh well.
dangermousie: (Chuno - hands)
Head to hanjae's lj for more detail, but have you ever dreamed you are going to get Feng Shao Feng as Xiang Yu, Crystal Liu as Consort Yu, and Leon Lai as Liu Bang? Because you are getting it!!!!! In an upcoming movie White Vengeance? Oh, why is not in my hands already????

Oh, how hot and gorgeous will FSF/Crystal Liu be? OMG. And with battles and tragedy and costumes and...ummm, is it wrong to find Liu Bang sexy too? Because Leon Lai does it for me in a major way. ILY, Emperor Gaozu - ok, I felt v.v. weird even typing that.

Am extra amused because it means FSF gets to be Xiang Yu regardless of Yu Zheng's wishes in the matter.

Also, not that I am complaining - I am a majorly happy camper - but why the rash of Xiang Yu-Liu Bang movies/dramas lately? In addition to this and Yu Zheng's drama with Ming Dao, there is also an upcoming movie with Yang Mi (who is presumably portraying neither Xiang Yu nor Liu Bang), called Last Banquet (also as per my cstuff guru hanjae).

Let the best Xiang Yu win!!! :)

This is also an odd coincidence because I am currently reading Mark Edward Lewis' "The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han" and it has this hilarious (to me) passage about Liu Bang:

As a youth, Gaozu refused to work in his family's business and instead spent his time drinking and carousing with similarly inclined friends. During his rise to power, Gaozu even tried to throw his own children out of a carriage to aid his escape. When his father was taken prisoner by Xiang Yu and threatened with being boiled and eaten (DM: wtf? Boiled, fine, but why eaten? Surely they had some chickens or pigs), Gaozu asked to share the soup. After becoming emperor, he richly rewarded a follower who persuaded Gaozu's father (dm: guess they didn't eat him, after all) to serve as a subject in Gaozu's empire, since there could be only one sun in the sky.
Gaozu's lack of connection to his family (dm: worthy husband of Lu Zhi, it seems) and place of origin stands in stark contrast with that of his chief rival, Xiang Yu...Advised that, having occupied and sacked the Qin capital, he should make his own capital there, Xiang Yu insteasd chose to return to Chu, rule in his home, and enfeoff his allies across the north of China. "To become rich and famous and then not go back to your old home is like putting on an embroidered coat and going out walking in the night. Who would know about it?" (Dm: my fear in walking in fancy clothes at night would be getting mugged, not unnoticed, but then am not fearsome hegemon-king). He could not leave his old home for the sake of an empire. Gaozu could, and so he triumphed."

I wish I could find an entire book in English on Liu Bang and Xiang Yu's struggle. Would be fascinating. Oh well.
dangermousie: (Default)
I am reading the latest in my romance binge, The Duke by Gaelen Foley (short verdict: so-so), and I kept wondering why the main premise doesn't bother me as much as it should - i.e. an 18th/19th century Duke marrying a courtesan, no matter how much he loves her? Yeah, right.

And then I realized the reason I am not completely falling out of my chair in disbelief is because of this, i.e. the marriage of Charles James Fox and Elizabeth Armistead. He was a very blue-blooded opposition leader in late 18th-century and she was a very famous courtesan (George IV was one of her clients). Even though she was Fox's mistress for years, she refused Fox's offer of marriage because she did not want to ruin his career, but she finally gave in and they were married in secret, and later revealed their marriage which was a huge huge scandal. Apparently they were quite happy together until his death. I remember coming across a book on her in the caverns of our University library and being fascinated.

So I suppose I can tolerate Ms Foley's plot because of them :)

Of course, Charles James Fox was also known for being an insane gambler who lost (in modern money equivalent) millions of pounds gambling and would play and drink all night only to go to Parliament straight from the tables and make some amazing speeches and get involved in debates. LOL.

Maybe someone should do a romance novel about them :P Only of course they wouldn't, because Fox wasn't good-looking by the wildest stretch of anyone's imagination and Elizabeth Armistead wasn't a blushing wilting lady waiting to be rescued but really successful at her job. Oh well.
dangermousie: (Default)
I am reading the latest in my romance binge, The Duke by Gaelen Foley (short verdict: so-so), and I kept wondering why the main premise doesn't bother me as much as it should - i.e. an 18th/19th century Duke marrying a courtesan, no matter how much he loves her? Yeah, right.

And then I realized the reason I am not completely falling out of my chair in disbelief is because of this, i.e. the marriage of Charles James Fox and Elizabeth Armistead. He was a very blue-blooded opposition leader in late 18th-century and she was a very famous courtesan (George IV was one of her clients). Even though she was Fox's mistress for years, she refused Fox's offer of marriage because she did not want to ruin his career, but she finally gave in and they were married in secret, and later revealed their marriage which was a huge huge scandal. Apparently they were quite happy together until his death. I remember coming across a book on her in the caverns of our University library and being fascinated.

So I suppose I can tolerate Ms Foley's plot because of them :)

Of course, Charles James Fox was also known for being an insane gambler who lost (in modern money equivalent) millions of pounds gambling and would play and drink all night only to go to Parliament straight from the tables and make some amazing speeches and get involved in debates. LOL.

Maybe someone should do a romance novel about them :P Only of course they wouldn't, because Fox wasn't good-looking by the wildest stretch of anyone's imagination and Elizabeth Armistead wasn't a blushing wilting lady waiting to be rescued but really successful at her job. Oh well.
dangermousie: (Default)
I am reading the latest in my romance binge, The Duke by Gaelen Foley (short verdict: so-so), and I kept wondering why the main premise doesn't bother me as much as it should - i.e. an 18th/19th century Duke marrying a courtesan, no matter how much he loves her? Yeah, right.

And then I realized the reason I am not completely falling out of my chair in disbelief is because of this, i.e. the marriage of Charles James Fox and Elizabeth Armistead. He was a very blue-blooded opposition leader in late 18th-century and she was a very famous courtesan (George IV was one of her clients). Even though she was Fox's mistress for years, she refused Fox's offer of marriage because she did not want to ruin his career, but she finally gave in and they were married in secret, and later revealed their marriage which was a huge huge scandal. Apparently they were quite happy together until his death. I remember coming across a book on her in the caverns of our University library and being fascinated.

So I suppose I can tolerate Ms Foley's plot because of them :)

Of course, Charles James Fox was also known for being an insane gambler who lost (in modern money equivalent) millions of pounds gambling and would play and drink all night only to go to Parliament straight from the tables and make some amazing speeches and get involved in debates. LOL.

Maybe someone should do a romance novel about them :P Only of course they wouldn't, because Fox wasn't good-looking by the wildest stretch of anyone's imagination and Elizabeth Armistead wasn't a blushing wilting lady waiting to be rescued but really successful at her job. Oh well.
dangermousie: (Default)
For a novel whose avowed purpose is to describe Simon de Montfort as some sort of a sex god, The Dragon and the Jewel is not too bad (nobody has raped anybody, and for a large chunk of the book the protagonists are happily married to each other) even if historical accuracy in the book is not the strongest.

But my main interest lay in trying to see how the author would deal with the ending. Romance novels are known for their 'happy endings at all costs' approach but I could not imagine how even the most optimistic writer could turn "and then Simon and some of his and Eleanor's sons were killed in battle of Evesham and his body was chopped up to bits to be sent as gifts to barons who helped defeat the rebel against the Crown. Oh, and Eleanor became a nun after his death" into a "and then they lived happily ever after."

Well - she avoided that very simply - she did not deal with that at all. She basically ends the book once Simon calls the first Parliament. She doesn't even mention his death in her afterword. Ahahahahahahha. He gets killed two years after her book ends but you would never know it from her novel.

Bwahahahahah!

That is a brilliant idea, actually. I can see a whole series of happy romance novels if you just do a little surgical removal of the historical ending. Maybe someone should write about the great romance of Isabella, wife of Edward II and Roger de Mortimer, an escaped rebel baron. It would all be mushy and awesome and end with their triumphal return to England together to defeat Edward II and take power. The author will just have to omit all the gruesome medieval punishments they inflicted on their enemies (including EII) and the little fact that as soon as Isabella and Edward II's son came of age he had his mother's lover put to death in a gruesome medieval way as well. (Isabella only forgave him after he got her some grandkids. Must have been an interesting Christmas dinner). Or how about a triumphant novel about Harold Godwinson, the powerful Saxon earl. Read all about him being crowned King of England and his sexytimes with his mistress Edith the Swan-necked. We'll just forget the pesky battle of Hastings.

I'd write such masterpieces myself but, alas, I am busy reading another one of "Dragon/Jewel" author's creations - the one where a Georgian lady drops through a time portal into when Romans ruled Britannia ans gets some really good times with a hunky Roman general. I am reading it for a deep deep plot.

ETA: Now I am going crazy trying to locate my copy of Falls the Shadow, i.e. the good novel about de Montfort but I have no idea where it went off to. I found every other Sharon Kay Penman book I own, including my favorite, The Sunne In Splendour about Richard III (I have never cried at the end of a book the way I bawled with Sunne) but no Falls the Shadow. Argh.
dangermousie: (Default)
For a novel whose avowed purpose is to describe Simon de Montfort as some sort of a sex god, The Dragon and the Jewel is not too bad (nobody has raped anybody, and for a large chunk of the book the protagonists are happily married to each other) even if historical accuracy in the book is not the strongest.

But my main interest lay in trying to see how the author would deal with the ending. Romance novels are known for their 'happy endings at all costs' approach but I could not imagine how even the most optimistic writer could turn "and then Simon and some of his and Eleanor's sons were killed in battle of Evesham and his body was chopped up to bits to be sent as gifts to barons who helped defeat the rebel against the Crown. Oh, and Eleanor became a nun after his death" into a "and then they lived happily ever after."

Well - she avoided that very simply - she did not deal with that at all. She basically ends the book once Simon calls the first Parliament. She doesn't even mention his death in her afterword. Ahahahahahahha. He gets killed two years after her book ends but you would never know it from her novel.

Bwahahahahah!

That is a brilliant idea, actually. I can see a whole series of happy romance novels if you just do a little surgical removal of the historical ending. Maybe someone should write about the great romance of Isabella, wife of Edward II and Roger de Mortimer, an escaped rebel baron. It would all be mushy and awesome and end with their triumphal return to England together to defeat Edward II and take power. The author will just have to omit all the gruesome medieval punishments they inflicted on their enemies (including EII) and the little fact that as soon as Isabella and Edward II's son came of age he had his mother's lover put to death in a gruesome medieval way as well. (Isabella only forgave him after he got her some grandkids. Must have been an interesting Christmas dinner). Or how about a triumphant novel about Harold Godwinson, the powerful Saxon earl. Read all about him being crowned King of England and his sexytimes with his mistress Edith the Swan-necked. We'll just forget the pesky battle of Hastings.

I'd write such masterpieces myself but, alas, I am busy reading another one of "Dragon/Jewel" author's creations - the one where a Georgian lady drops through a time portal into when Romans ruled Britannia ans gets some really good times with a hunky Roman general. I am reading it for a deep deep plot.

ETA: Now I am going crazy trying to locate my copy of Falls the Shadow, i.e. the good novel about de Montfort but I have no idea where it went off to. I found every other Sharon Kay Penman book I own, including my favorite, The Sunne In Splendour about Richard III (I have never cried at the end of a book the way I bawled with Sunne) but no Falls the Shadow. Argh.
dangermousie: (Default)
For a novel whose avowed purpose is to describe Simon de Montfort as some sort of a sex god, The Dragon and the Jewel is not too bad (nobody has raped anybody, and for a large chunk of the book the protagonists are happily married to each other) even if historical accuracy in the book is not the strongest.

But my main interest lay in trying to see how the author would deal with the ending. Romance novels are known for their 'happy endings at all costs' approach but I could not imagine how even the most optimistic writer could turn "and then Simon and some of his and Eleanor's sons were killed in battle of Evesham and his body was chopped up to bits to be sent as gifts to barons who helped defeat the rebel against the Crown. Oh, and Eleanor became a nun after his death" into a "and then they lived happily ever after."

Well - she avoided that very simply - she did not deal with that at all. She basically ends the book once Simon calls the first Parliament. She doesn't even mention his death in her afterword. Ahahahahahahha. He gets killed two years after her book ends but you would never know it from her novel.

Bwahahahahah!

That is a brilliant idea, actually. I can see a whole series of happy romance novels if you just do a little surgical removal of the historical ending. Maybe someone should write about the great romance of Isabella, wife of Edward II and Roger de Mortimer, an escaped rebel baron. It would all be mushy and awesome and end with their triumphal return to England together to defeat Edward II and take power. The author will just have to omit all the gruesome medieval punishments they inflicted on their enemies (including EII) and the little fact that as soon as Isabella and Edward II's son came of age he had his mother's lover put to death in a gruesome medieval way as well. (Isabella only forgave him after he got her some grandkids. Must have been an interesting Christmas dinner). Or how about a triumphant novel about Harold Godwinson, the powerful Saxon earl. Read all about him being crowned King of England and his sexytimes with his mistress Edith the Swan-necked. We'll just forget the pesky battle of Hastings.

I'd write such masterpieces myself but, alas, I am busy reading another one of "Dragon/Jewel" author's creations - the one where a Georgian lady drops through a time portal into when Romans ruled Britannia ans gets some really good times with a hunky Roman general. I am reading it for a deep deep plot.

ETA: Now I am going crazy trying to locate my copy of Falls the Shadow, i.e. the good novel about de Montfort but I have no idea where it went off to. I found every other Sharon Kay Penman book I own, including my favorite, The Sunne In Splendour about Richard III (I have never cried at the end of a book the way I bawled with Sunne) but no Falls the Shadow. Argh.
dangermousie: (Default)


Looks like a typical cheesy 1980s romance novel cover, right?

Wrong.

Do you know who the man with the waxed back, Fabio hair, and a distressing lack of shirt is supposed to be?

Simon de Montfort. That's right, the man known to history for leading a revolt against Henry III and convening the first elected Parliament in English history. He is known as one of the fathers of modern Parliamentary democracy. Somehow I never knew that in his free time he liked parading around a la gigolo.

Do you know who the scarily-painted woman with the mysteriously sliding dress and a precarious crown (who wears a crown for making out anyway?) is supposed to be? Eleanor of England, the daughter of King John, and eventually de Montfort's wife. I would think that an intelligent, powerful noblewoman of the period would know better than to parade around England in an outfit designed to cause hypothermia, and would have enough money to buy an outfit that covers her shoulders. Apparently not.

Basically, I was rereading Sharon Kay Penman's Falls the Shadow, a brilliant historical novel about de Montfort and Eleanor (it's the second part of her Welsh trilogy). I have such fond memories reading it all night in my dorm with music blasting. That made me want to look if there are any other good fiction or non-fiction books on de Montfort, aside from Ellis Peters' The Brothers of Gwynedd trilogy (found a good nonfiction one btw). However, by mistake I hit images and this popped up - I could not help but look.

This is the summary on the back:

HE WAS HER FOLLY AND HER PASSION. With her sapphire eyes and silken dark hair, Princess Eleanor was a bewitching beauty made for a man's pleasure. But once a child bride widowed at a tender age, she swore never to marry again and took a vow of eternal chastity ... until Simon de Montfort marched into England and set his smoldering dark gaze upon her, King Henry's youngest sister, the royal family's most precious jewel. Bold, arrogant, and invincible, the towering Norman knight inspired awe in the bravest of men... and a reckless desire in Eleanor's untried heart. SHE WAS HIS PRIZE AND HIS LOVE. They called him the Dragon, but the most feared and dangerous warlord in all the land had one fatal weakness. Inflamed by Eleanor's incandescent loveliness and intoxicating innocence, he would pursue her with a passion that demanded unconditional surrender ... a passion that would erupt in scandal and rock the embattled realm, staining the pages of history with blood and betrayal ... igniting the pages of history with the rapture of all-consuming love...

Ahahahahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

I could not help it. Judge away, for I am now an unabashed owner of Dragon and Jewel on my Kindle. It is going to feel a lot like RPF porn and hence lies my horrified amusement. I mean - it's like writing smut about Benjamin Franklin or describing Henry VIII's loins of passion or whatever. Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

In author's (slim) defense, Simon de Montfort and Eleanor did have a very famous romance - she did ditch her nun-like wow of chastity, they married secretly, and there was a huge uproar among nobility when they admitted their marriage (de Montfort was not English by birth and not noble enough for a Princess etc). And it's rare enough to find a love match for Medieval nobility, in the first place. But still...it's Simon de Montfort as Fabio. My God.

(Yes, I know I am behind on replies).
dangermousie: (Default)


Looks like a typical cheesy 1980s romance novel cover, right?

Wrong.

Do you know who the man with the waxed back, Fabio hair, and a distressing lack of shirt is supposed to be?

Simon de Montfort. That's right, the man known to history for leading a revolt against Henry III and convening the first elected Parliament in English history. He is known as one of the fathers of modern Parliamentary democracy. Somehow I never knew that in his free time he liked parading around a la gigolo.

Do you know who the scarily-painted woman with the mysteriously sliding dress and a precarious crown (who wears a crown for making out anyway?) is supposed to be? Eleanor of England, the daughter of King John, and eventually de Montfort's wife. I would think that an intelligent, powerful noblewoman of the period would know better than to parade around England in an outfit designed to cause hypothermia, and would have enough money to buy an outfit that covers her shoulders. Apparently not.

Basically, I was rereading Sharon Kay Penman's Falls the Shadow, a brilliant historical novel about de Montfort and Eleanor (it's the second part of her Welsh trilogy). I have such fond memories reading it all night in my dorm with music blasting. That made me want to look if there are any other good fiction or non-fiction books on de Montfort, aside from Ellis Peters' The Brothers of Gwynedd trilogy (found a good nonfiction one btw). However, by mistake I hit images and this popped up - I could not help but look.

This is the summary on the back:

HE WAS HER FOLLY AND HER PASSION. With her sapphire eyes and silken dark hair, Princess Eleanor was a bewitching beauty made for a man's pleasure. But once a child bride widowed at a tender age, she swore never to marry again and took a vow of eternal chastity ... until Simon de Montfort marched into England and set his smoldering dark gaze upon her, King Henry's youngest sister, the royal family's most precious jewel. Bold, arrogant, and invincible, the towering Norman knight inspired awe in the bravest of men... and a reckless desire in Eleanor's untried heart. SHE WAS HIS PRIZE AND HIS LOVE. They called him the Dragon, but the most feared and dangerous warlord in all the land had one fatal weakness. Inflamed by Eleanor's incandescent loveliness and intoxicating innocence, he would pursue her with a passion that demanded unconditional surrender ... a passion that would erupt in scandal and rock the embattled realm, staining the pages of history with blood and betrayal ... igniting the pages of history with the rapture of all-consuming love...

Ahahahahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

I could not help it. Judge away, for I am now an unabashed owner of Dragon and Jewel on my Kindle. It is going to feel a lot like RPF porn and hence lies my horrified amusement. I mean - it's like writing smut about Benjamin Franklin or describing Henry VIII's loins of passion or whatever. Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

In author's (slim) defense, Simon de Montfort and Eleanor did have a very famous romance - she did ditch her nun-like wow of chastity, they married secretly, and there was a huge uproar among nobility when they admitted their marriage (de Montfort was not English by birth and not noble enough for a Princess etc). And it's rare enough to find a love match for Medieval nobility, in the first place. But still...it's Simon de Montfort as Fabio. My God.

(Yes, I know I am behind on replies).
dangermousie: (Default)


Looks like a typical cheesy 1980s romance novel cover, right?

Wrong.

Do you know who the man with the waxed back, Fabio hair, and a distressing lack of shirt is supposed to be?

Simon de Montfort. That's right, the man known to history for leading a revolt against Henry III and convening the first elected Parliament in English history. He is known as one of the fathers of modern Parliamentary democracy. Somehow I never knew that in his free time he liked parading around a la gigolo.

Do you know who the scarily-painted woman with the mysteriously sliding dress and a precarious crown (who wears a crown for making out anyway?) is supposed to be? Eleanor of England, the daughter of King John, and eventually de Montfort's wife. I would think that an intelligent, powerful noblewoman of the period would know better than to parade around England in an outfit designed to cause hypothermia, and would have enough money to buy an outfit that covers her shoulders. Apparently not.

Basically, I was rereading Sharon Kay Penman's Falls the Shadow, a brilliant historical novel about de Montfort and Eleanor (it's the second part of her Welsh trilogy). I have such fond memories reading it all night in my dorm with music blasting. That made me want to look if there are any other good fiction or non-fiction books on de Montfort, aside from Ellis Peters' The Brothers of Gwynedd trilogy (found a good nonfiction one btw). However, by mistake I hit images and this popped up - I could not help but look.

This is the summary on the back:

HE WAS HER FOLLY AND HER PASSION. With her sapphire eyes and silken dark hair, Princess Eleanor was a bewitching beauty made for a man's pleasure. But once a child bride widowed at a tender age, she swore never to marry again and took a vow of eternal chastity ... until Simon de Montfort marched into England and set his smoldering dark gaze upon her, King Henry's youngest sister, the royal family's most precious jewel. Bold, arrogant, and invincible, the towering Norman knight inspired awe in the bravest of men... and a reckless desire in Eleanor's untried heart. SHE WAS HIS PRIZE AND HIS LOVE. They called him the Dragon, but the most feared and dangerous warlord in all the land had one fatal weakness. Inflamed by Eleanor's incandescent loveliness and intoxicating innocence, he would pursue her with a passion that demanded unconditional surrender ... a passion that would erupt in scandal and rock the embattled realm, staining the pages of history with blood and betrayal ... igniting the pages of history with the rapture of all-consuming love...

Ahahahahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

I could not help it. Judge away, for I am now an unabashed owner of Dragon and Jewel on my Kindle. It is going to feel a lot like RPF porn and hence lies my horrified amusement. I mean - it's like writing smut about Benjamin Franklin or describing Henry VIII's loins of passion or whatever. Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

In author's (slim) defense, Simon de Montfort and Eleanor did have a very famous romance - she did ditch her nun-like wow of chastity, they married secretly, and there was a huge uproar among nobility when they admitted their marriage (de Montfort was not English by birth and not noble enough for a Princess etc). And it's rare enough to find a love match for Medieval nobility, in the first place. But still...it's Simon de Montfort as Fabio. My God.

(Yes, I know I am behind on replies).
dangermousie: (Legend: Kiha/Ho Gae by alexandral)
I am in mid-20s eps and am finding The Myth increasingly hard to watch. It has not taken a nosedive in quality (on the contrary, it gets better and better) but the problem is the story is basically watching the bad guys win - you know Zhao Gao will undermine any potential for a Qin Dynasty, you know the able Fu Su will get pushed aside for talentless Hu Hai, you know the civil wars will start again, you know Lu Zhi will get everything she wants, you know Liu Bang will win over Xiang Yu (I am aware they are both somewhat controversial in history but in the drama I am clearly on Xiang Yu's side while Liu Bang makes me want to crawl into the screen and throttle him myself). You know it will happen and you watch how it gets that way - how it all unfolds. That's a heck of a depressing viewing.

You see it all unfold and not only do you know nothing will stop it but these people become real people to you so you actually care about their fate. You know the fictional main protagonist won't be able to fix anything or find his own happiness, for that matter.

It's the kind of feeling I used to get reading Sharon K. Penman's Welsh Trilogy. Sort of an anger/hopelessness mix.

It did make me desperate to get my hands on a non-fiction account of the Qin/Han Dynasties. Off to the library for me...
dangermousie: (Legend: Kiha/Ho Gae by alexandral)
I am in mid-20s eps and am finding The Myth increasingly hard to watch. It has not taken a nosedive in quality (on the contrary, it gets better and better) but the problem is the story is basically watching the bad guys win - you know Zhao Gao will undermine any potential for a Qin Dynasty, you know the able Fu Su will get pushed aside for talentless Hu Hai, you know the civil wars will start again, you know Lu Zhi will get everything she wants, you know Liu Bang will win over Xiang Yu (I am aware they are both somewhat controversial in history but in the drama I am clearly on Xiang Yu's side while Liu Bang makes me want to crawl into the screen and throttle him myself). You know it will happen and you watch how it gets that way - how it all unfolds. That's a heck of a depressing viewing.

You see it all unfold and not only do you know nothing will stop it but these people become real people to you so you actually care about their fate. You know the fictional main protagonist won't be able to fix anything or find his own happiness, for that matter.

It's the kind of feeling I used to get reading Sharon K. Penman's Welsh Trilogy. Sort of an anger/hopelessness mix.

It did make me desperate to get my hands on a non-fiction account of the Qin/Han Dynasties. Off to the library for me...

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November 2012

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