dangermousie: (Farscape: Chiana by icequeen3101)
Out of morbid curiosity, I tried Lucinda Brant's Noble Satyr, driven by the fact that a lot of irate reviewers said it was a blatant rip-off of Georgette Heyer's These Old Shades, one of my favorite books.

Short version - yes, it's a rip-off. But that is not even the crime here, the crime is that it is so deadly dull. The sole advantage, such as it is, over TOS, is that TOS, written in 1926, does not have sex scenes, and NS does. I'd trade every sex scene in existence, however, for a sense of humor, character development, and protagonists I care about.

TOS, for those who are unfamiliar with it, is one of the earliest novels of Georgette Heyer, the founder and patron saint of Regency romance. (Though TOS is actually set in France in 1750s, i.e., Georgian era). It created a lot of tropes that are still used, but nonetheless reads very fresh. There is cross-dressing, chases, revenge, murder attempts, family secrets, and the good old (though I suppose not so old back then) 'rake redeemed by a love of a woman' set-up. Our hero, the Duke of Avon, who has a well-earned awful reputation and is 40 without any desire to settle or slow down, comes across our heroine, Leonie, when she is dressed as a boy, "Leon." Intrigued by her resemblance to his long-standing enemy, he decides to hire her as his page. And the story goes from there...

So, why do I love TOS so and found NS a horrible bore?

1. This is such a funny, witty, biting novel. I literally laughed out loud repeatedly.
2. Leonie is probably one of my favorite Heyer heroines (and 'pig person' is an insult I adopted :P) She's hot-tempered, impatient, brave, unconventional, blunt and reminds me freakishly of Chiana from Farscape, minus Chiana's love of sexual experimentation.
3. Most 'hardened rake reformed by a love of a good woman' stories either bore me, leave me incredulous, or both, but here it actually works. For one, because Leonie is not a 'good woman' by a standard definition, being prone to rages, fully cognizant of Avon's reputation and being fine with it, and at one point lamenting to Avon that he didn't kill her father but should have :) She puts him on a pedestal and he actually ends up working to be worthy of it. For another, Heyer is great at character development and the biggest delight of the book to me is watching the slow change in their relationship - it starts with her adoration of him for being rescued from the slums and his indifference, progresses to his being fond and amused by her, and by the end, she's the one who's winding him around her finger. I always thought it was pretty symbolic that they start with her kneeling to him (as his page) and end with him kneeling to her. They are a very unconventional couple, but it works. Oh, and the age difference is addressed (and doesn't bother me in 1750s upper class anyway).
4. Secondary characters crack me up.
5. Cross-dressing!

I always wished they made a movie out of it...

Not related,, but I looooove this fanvid of Farscape, that concentrates on John's insanity...

dangermousie: (Farscape: Chiana by icequeen3101)
Out of morbid curiosity, I tried Lucinda Brant's Noble Satyr, driven by the fact that a lot of irate reviewers said it was a blatant rip-off of Georgette Heyer's These Old Shades, one of my favorite books.

Short version - yes, it's a rip-off. But that is not even the crime here, the crime is that it is so deadly dull. The sole advantage, such as it is, over TOS, is that TOS, written in 1926, does not have sex scenes, and NS does. I'd trade every sex scene in existence, however, for a sense of humor, character development, and protagonists I care about.

TOS, for those who are unfamiliar with it, is one of the earliest novels of Georgette Heyer, the founder and patron saint of Regency romance. (Though TOS is actually set in France in 1750s, i.e., Georgian era). It created a lot of tropes that are still used, but nonetheless reads very fresh. There is cross-dressing, chases, revenge, murder attempts, family secrets, and the good old (though I suppose not so old back then) 'rake redeemed by a love of a woman' set-up. Our hero, the Duke of Avon, who has a well-earned awful reputation and is 40 without any desire to settle or slow down, comes across our heroine, Leonie, when she is dressed as a boy, "Leon." Intrigued by her resemblance to his long-standing enemy, he decides to hire her as his page. And the story goes from there...

So, why do I love TOS so and found NS a horrible bore?

1. This is such a funny, witty, biting novel. I literally laughed out loud repeatedly.
2. Leonie is probably one of my favorite Heyer heroines (and 'pig person' is an insult I adopted :P) She's hot-tempered, impatient, brave, unconventional, blunt and reminds me freakishly of Chiana from Farscape, minus Chiana's love of sexual experimentation.
3. Most 'hardened rake reformed by a love of a good woman' stories either bore me, leave me incredulous, or both, but here it actually works. For one, because Leonie is not a 'good woman' by a standard definition, being prone to rages, fully cognizant of Avon's reputation and being fine with it, and at one point lamenting to Avon that he didn't kill her father but should have :) She puts him on a pedestal and he actually ends up working to be worthy of it. For another, Heyer is great at character development and the biggest delight of the book to me is watching the slow change in their relationship - it starts with her adoration of him for being rescued from the slums and his indifference, progresses to his being fond and amused by her, and by the end, she's the one who's winding him around her finger. I always thought it was pretty symbolic that they start with her kneeling to him (as his page) and end with him kneeling to her. They are a very unconventional couple, but it works. Oh, and the age difference is addressed (and doesn't bother me in 1750s upper class anyway).
4. Secondary characters crack me up.
5. Cross-dressing!

I always wished they made a movie out of it...

Not related,, but I looooove this fanvid of Farscape, that concentrates on John's insanity...

dangermousie: (Farscape: Chiana by icequeen3101)
Out of morbid curiosity, I tried Lucinda Brant's Noble Satyr, driven by the fact that a lot of irate reviewers said it was a blatant rip-off of Georgette Heyer's These Old Shades, one of my favorite books.

Short version - yes, it's a rip-off. But that is not even the crime here, the crime is that it is so deadly dull. The sole advantage, such as it is, over TOS, is that TOS, written in 1926, does not have sex scenes, and NS does. I'd trade every sex scene in existence, however, for a sense of humor, character development, and protagonists I care about.

TOS, for those who are unfamiliar with it, is one of the earliest novels of Georgette Heyer, the founder and patron saint of Regency romance. (Though TOS is actually set in France in 1750s, i.e., Georgian era). It created a lot of tropes that are still used, but nonetheless reads very fresh. There is cross-dressing, chases, revenge, murder attempts, family secrets, and the good old (though I suppose not so old back then) 'rake redeemed by a love of a woman' set-up. Our hero, the Duke of Avon, who has a well-earned awful reputation and is 40 without any desire to settle or slow down, comes across our heroine, Leonie, when she is dressed as a boy, "Leon." Intrigued by her resemblance to his long-standing enemy, he decides to hire her as his page. And the story goes from there...

So, why do I love TOS so and found NS a horrible bore?

1. This is such a funny, witty, biting novel. I literally laughed out loud repeatedly.
2. Leonie is probably one of my favorite Heyer heroines (and 'pig person' is an insult I adopted :P) She's hot-tempered, impatient, brave, unconventional, blunt and reminds me freakishly of Chiana from Farscape, minus Chiana's love of sexual experimentation.
3. Most 'hardened rake reformed by a love of a good woman' stories either bore me, leave me incredulous, or both, but here it actually works. For one, because Leonie is not a 'good woman' by a standard definition, being prone to rages, fully cognizant of Avon's reputation and being fine with it, and at one point lamenting to Avon that he didn't kill her father but should have :) She puts him on a pedestal and he actually ends up working to be worthy of it. For another, Heyer is great at character development and the biggest delight of the book to me is watching the slow change in their relationship - it starts with her adoration of him for being rescued from the slums and his indifference, progresses to his being fond and amused by her, and by the end, she's the one who's winding him around her finger. I always thought it was pretty symbolic that they start with her kneeling to him (as his page) and end with him kneeling to her. They are a very unconventional couple, but it works. Oh, and the age difference is addressed (and doesn't bother me in 1750s upper class anyway).
4. Secondary characters crack me up.
5. Cross-dressing!

I always wished they made a movie out of it...

Not related,, but I looooove this fanvid of Farscape, that concentrates on John's insanity...

dangermousie: (Default)
I was feeling a little blah in the morning so I decided to read one of my favorite pick-me-up books, Georgette Heyer's Friday's Child.

If I were going to compile a list of a dozen books to take to a desert island, FC would be on it - the story of Sherry and his Kitten is my favorite Heyer.

Partly a comedy and partly a romance, FC makes me think strongly of a period PG Wodehouse, only minus the omniscient Jeeves, leaving various Woosters to fluster around on their own.

The set-up is pretty simple (and copied ad nauseam by other authors since). Lord Sheringham (known to all his friends as Sherry) is a young man who is chafing because, at 22, he has 3 years to go, until the trust his inheritance is in will get wound up, unless he marries first. Because of that, and a fit of annoyance over being rejected by a gal he proposed to (she very sensibly assumes he isn't really in love with her but only chasing after her because it's fashionable), and a few other things, he ends up marrying Hero Wantage, a 17-year-old orphan. Hero (nicknamed Kitten by Sherry) is as well-born as he is, but she is a poor relation of his neighbors. They grew up together and he used to boss her around when they were kids etc, but since in her life he was the only person who was ever kind to her, she rather idolizes him. Plus, she was about to be packed off to be a governess.

Sherry, while not dumb, is not particularly bright either. And I bet he's never read a book he wasn't forced to, in his entire life. He is rather selfish and thoughtless but honest and with a sense of responsibility that needs to be triggered. Just as well because Kitten is adorable, well-tempered, and as naive and unworldly about sophisticated city life as the animal she is nicknamed after.

So this odd couple - she adores him, but it's an idolization of a childhood hero and not 'real' love, and he treats her as a sort of a younger sister, embark on marriage of convenience. (No sex, thankfully, it would have been too weird).

And the story is so incredibly hilarious. It's one of the rare books I laugh out loud at. I adore Sherry and Kitten, I love all the secondary characters - Sherry's dim friend Ferdy, the relatively common-sense Gil, the Byronic hero George who is pining over fair Isabella (the biggest beauty of the year and the gal who refused Sherry - I adore her), Sherry's fake hypochondriac of a mother. It's just - God, I love that book and them all.

One of the reasons I love it so much that in any other novel of this type, it would be George and Isabella who would be hero and heroine and Sherry and Kitten would be comic relief supporting characters. But Heyer was wonderful at making her heroes and heroines out of characters who would normally be side-characters in a traditional romance (the wonderful Cotillion and Freddy Standen is another great example of it. In any other novel, Kitty would have reformed Jack and been swept off her feet by him for happy marriage, as opposed to realizing that the man who she wants to spend her life with is the generous, reliable, non-brilliant Freddy).

And, of course, it's also a story of growing up - the characters are SO young, even by Heyer standards. Kitten is her youngest heroine, even more so than Leonie from These Old Shades, I think. And Sherry is one of her youngest heroes - I love how in the course of the story, because of having a responsibility of a dependent, Sherry actually grows up and matures - he might have started out rather selfish, but it's thoughtlessness not malice. Because he is good-natured and honest, he can grow up and become considerate of Kitten and her wants and needs. And yes, he falls in love with her, of course, but what I like even more is that he grows up. And Kitten is so adorable.

As bookshelvesofdoom blogger put it: "Seeing Sherry grow from a selfish (if likable) ass into a worried mother hen into a loving husband would have been pleasure enough, but Hero herself was also a joy -- she's an innocent, and she's certainly starry-eyed when it comes to Sherry, but she's never insipid. She does have a temper. And she does have an inner strength. She's someone who the others can't help but love and feel protective of, and I felt the same way about her. While a lot of the book made me laugh out loud, there were other bits that had me so enraged with Sherry that I had tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat."

Couldn't have said it better myself!

Sample passage from FC (also coutesy of bookshelves of doom):

'Look at it which way you like, it don't make sense. For one thing, a hero ain't a female, and for another it ain't a name. At least,' he added cautiously, 'it ain't one I've ever heard of. Ten to one you've made one of your muffs, Sherry!'

'Oh no, I truly am called Hero!' the lady assured him. 'It's out of Shakespeare.'

'Oh, out of Shakespeare, is it?' said Ferdy. 'That accounts for my not having heard it before!'

'You're out of Shakespeare too,' said Hero, helping herself liberally from a dish of green peas.

'I am?' Ferdy exclaimed, much struck.

'Yes, in the Tempest, I think.'

'Well, if that don't beat all!' Ferdy said, looking around at his friends. 'She says I'm out of Shakespeare! Must tell my father that. Shouldn't think he knows.'

'Yes, and now I come to think of it, Sherry's out of Shakespeare too,' said Hero, smiling warmly upon her spouse.

'No, I'm not,' replied the Viscount, refusing to be dragged into these deep waters. 'Named after my grandfather.'
dangermousie: (Default)
I was feeling a little blah in the morning so I decided to read one of my favorite pick-me-up books, Georgette Heyer's Friday's Child.

If I were going to compile a list of a dozen books to take to a desert island, FC would be on it - the story of Sherry and his Kitten is my favorite Heyer.

Partly a comedy and partly a romance, FC makes me think strongly of a period PG Wodehouse, only minus the omniscient Jeeves, leaving various Woosters to fluster around on their own.

The set-up is pretty simple (and copied ad nauseam by other authors since). Lord Sheringham (known to all his friends as Sherry) is a young man who is chafing because, at 22, he has 3 years to go, until the trust his inheritance is in will get wound up, unless he marries first. Because of that, and a fit of annoyance over being rejected by a gal he proposed to (she very sensibly assumes he isn't really in love with her but only chasing after her because it's fashionable), and a few other things, he ends up marrying Hero Wantage, a 17-year-old orphan. Hero (nicknamed Kitten by Sherry) is as well-born as he is, but she is a poor relation of his neighbors. They grew up together and he used to boss her around when they were kids etc, but since in her life he was the only person who was ever kind to her, she rather idolizes him. Plus, she was about to be packed off to be a governess.

Sherry, while not dumb, is not particularly bright either. And I bet he's never read a book he wasn't forced to, in his entire life. He is rather selfish and thoughtless but honest and with a sense of responsibility that needs to be triggered. Just as well because Kitten is adorable, well-tempered, and as naive and unworldly about sophisticated city life as the animal she is nicknamed after.

So this odd couple - she adores him, but it's an idolization of a childhood hero and not 'real' love, and he treats her as a sort of a younger sister, embark on marriage of convenience. (No sex, thankfully, it would have been too weird).

And the story is so incredibly hilarious. It's one of the rare books I laugh out loud at. I adore Sherry and Kitten, I love all the secondary characters - Sherry's dim friend Ferdy, the relatively common-sense Gil, the Byronic hero George who is pining over fair Isabella (the biggest beauty of the year and the gal who refused Sherry - I adore her), Sherry's fake hypochondriac of a mother. It's just - God, I love that book and them all.

One of the reasons I love it so much that in any other novel of this type, it would be George and Isabella who would be hero and heroine and Sherry and Kitten would be comic relief supporting characters. But Heyer was wonderful at making her heroes and heroines out of characters who would normally be side-characters in a traditional romance (the wonderful Cotillion and Freddy Standen is another great example of it. In any other novel, Kitty would have reformed Jack and been swept off her feet by him for happy marriage, as opposed to realizing that the man who she wants to spend her life with is the generous, reliable, non-brilliant Freddy).

And, of course, it's also a story of growing up - the characters are SO young, even by Heyer standards. Kitten is her youngest heroine, even more so than Leonie from These Old Shades, I think. And Sherry is one of her youngest heroes - I love how in the course of the story, because of having a responsibility of a dependent, Sherry actually grows up and matures - he might have started out rather selfish, but it's thoughtlessness not malice. Because he is good-natured and honest, he can grow up and become considerate of Kitten and her wants and needs. And yes, he falls in love with her, of course, but what I like even more is that he grows up. And Kitten is so adorable.

As bookshelvesofdoom blogger put it: "Seeing Sherry grow from a selfish (if likable) ass into a worried mother hen into a loving husband would have been pleasure enough, but Hero herself was also a joy -- she's an innocent, and she's certainly starry-eyed when it comes to Sherry, but she's never insipid. She does have a temper. And she does have an inner strength. She's someone who the others can't help but love and feel protective of, and I felt the same way about her. While a lot of the book made me laugh out loud, there were other bits that had me so enraged with Sherry that I had tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat."

Couldn't have said it better myself!

Sample passage from FC (also coutesy of bookshelves of doom):

'Look at it which way you like, it don't make sense. For one thing, a hero ain't a female, and for another it ain't a name. At least,' he added cautiously, 'it ain't one I've ever heard of. Ten to one you've made one of your muffs, Sherry!'

'Oh no, I truly am called Hero!' the lady assured him. 'It's out of Shakespeare.'

'Oh, out of Shakespeare, is it?' said Ferdy. 'That accounts for my not having heard it before!'

'You're out of Shakespeare too,' said Hero, helping herself liberally from a dish of green peas.

'I am?' Ferdy exclaimed, much struck.

'Yes, in the Tempest, I think.'

'Well, if that don't beat all!' Ferdy said, looking around at his friends. 'She says I'm out of Shakespeare! Must tell my father that. Shouldn't think he knows.'

'Yes, and now I come to think of it, Sherry's out of Shakespeare too,' said Hero, smiling warmly upon her spouse.

'No, I'm not,' replied the Viscount, refusing to be dragged into these deep waters. 'Named after my grandfather.'
dangermousie: (Default)
I was feeling a little blah in the morning so I decided to read one of my favorite pick-me-up books, Georgette Heyer's Friday's Child.

If I were going to compile a list of a dozen books to take to a desert island, FC would be on it - the story of Sherry and his Kitten is my favorite Heyer.

Partly a comedy and partly a romance, FC makes me think strongly of a period PG Wodehouse, only minus the omniscient Jeeves, leaving various Woosters to fluster around on their own.

The set-up is pretty simple (and copied ad nauseam by other authors since). Lord Sheringham (known to all his friends as Sherry) is a young man who is chafing because, at 22, he has 3 years to go, until the trust his inheritance is in will get wound up, unless he marries first. Because of that, and a fit of annoyance over being rejected by a gal he proposed to (she very sensibly assumes he isn't really in love with her but only chasing after her because it's fashionable), and a few other things, he ends up marrying Hero Wantage, a 17-year-old orphan. Hero (nicknamed Kitten by Sherry) is as well-born as he is, but she is a poor relation of his neighbors. They grew up together and he used to boss her around when they were kids etc, but since in her life he was the only person who was ever kind to her, she rather idolizes him. Plus, she was about to be packed off to be a governess.

Sherry, while not dumb, is not particularly bright either. And I bet he's never read a book he wasn't forced to, in his entire life. He is rather selfish and thoughtless but honest and with a sense of responsibility that needs to be triggered. Just as well because Kitten is adorable, well-tempered, and as naive and unworldly about sophisticated city life as the animal she is nicknamed after.

So this odd couple - she adores him, but it's an idolization of a childhood hero and not 'real' love, and he treats her as a sort of a younger sister, embark on marriage of convenience. (No sex, thankfully, it would have been too weird).

And the story is so incredibly hilarious. It's one of the rare books I laugh out loud at. I adore Sherry and Kitten, I love all the secondary characters - Sherry's dim friend Ferdy, the relatively common-sense Gil, the Byronic hero George who is pining over fair Isabella (the biggest beauty of the year and the gal who refused Sherry - I adore her), Sherry's fake hypochondriac of a mother. It's just - God, I love that book and them all.

One of the reasons I love it so much that in any other novel of this type, it would be George and Isabella who would be hero and heroine and Sherry and Kitten would be comic relief supporting characters. But Heyer was wonderful at making her heroes and heroines out of characters who would normally be side-characters in a traditional romance (the wonderful Cotillion and Freddy Standen is another great example of it. In any other novel, Kitty would have reformed Jack and been swept off her feet by him for happy marriage, as opposed to realizing that the man who she wants to spend her life with is the generous, reliable, non-brilliant Freddy).

And, of course, it's also a story of growing up - the characters are SO young, even by Heyer standards. Kitten is her youngest heroine, even more so than Leonie from These Old Shades, I think. And Sherry is one of her youngest heroes - I love how in the course of the story, because of having a responsibility of a dependent, Sherry actually grows up and matures - he might have started out rather selfish, but it's thoughtlessness not malice. Because he is good-natured and honest, he can grow up and become considerate of Kitten and her wants and needs. And yes, he falls in love with her, of course, but what I like even more is that he grows up. And Kitten is so adorable.

As bookshelvesofdoom blogger put it: "Seeing Sherry grow from a selfish (if likable) ass into a worried mother hen into a loving husband would have been pleasure enough, but Hero herself was also a joy -- she's an innocent, and she's certainly starry-eyed when it comes to Sherry, but she's never insipid. She does have a temper. And she does have an inner strength. She's someone who the others can't help but love and feel protective of, and I felt the same way about her. While a lot of the book made me laugh out loud, there were other bits that had me so enraged with Sherry that I had tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat."

Couldn't have said it better myself!

Sample passage from FC (also coutesy of bookshelves of doom):

'Look at it which way you like, it don't make sense. For one thing, a hero ain't a female, and for another it ain't a name. At least,' he added cautiously, 'it ain't one I've ever heard of. Ten to one you've made one of your muffs, Sherry!'

'Oh no, I truly am called Hero!' the lady assured him. 'It's out of Shakespeare.'

'Oh, out of Shakespeare, is it?' said Ferdy. 'That accounts for my not having heard it before!'

'You're out of Shakespeare too,' said Hero, helping herself liberally from a dish of green peas.

'I am?' Ferdy exclaimed, much struck.

'Yes, in the Tempest, I think.'

'Well, if that don't beat all!' Ferdy said, looking around at his friends. 'She says I'm out of Shakespeare! Must tell my father that. Shouldn't think he knows.'

'Yes, and now I come to think of it, Sherry's out of Shakespeare too,' said Hero, smiling warmly upon her spouse.

'No, I'm not,' replied the Viscount, refusing to be dragged into these deep waters. 'Named after my grandfather.'

Woe

Mar. 7th, 2006 07:43 pm
dangermousie: (Kenshin: Misao/Aoshi by roninhonor)
I have been reading Aoshi/Misao fluff. I have no shame. Or at least not enough to stop.

Damn you, Georgette Heyer and "These Old Shades." You have ruined me. Well, at least Aoshi does not wear jewelled heels and Misao isn't cross-dressing as a boy page. Though why this is a good thing isn't too clear to me.

Woe.

And thus ends the entry intelligible to no one. Except possibly to [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer. I don't think there is a huge Heyer/Kenshin fandoms overlap.

Woe

Mar. 7th, 2006 07:43 pm
dangermousie: (Kenshin: Misao/Aoshi by roninhonor)
I have been reading Aoshi/Misao fluff. I have no shame. Or at least not enough to stop.

Damn you, Georgette Heyer and "These Old Shades." You have ruined me. Well, at least Aoshi does not wear jewelled heels and Misao isn't cross-dressing as a boy page. Though why this is a good thing isn't too clear to me.

Woe.

And thus ends the entry intelligible to no one. Except possibly to [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer. I don't think there is a huge Heyer/Kenshin fandoms overlap.

Woe

Mar. 7th, 2006 07:43 pm
dangermousie: (Kenshin: Misao/Aoshi by roninhonor)
I have been reading Aoshi/Misao fluff. I have no shame. Or at least not enough to stop.

Damn you, Georgette Heyer and "These Old Shades." You have ruined me. Well, at least Aoshi does not wear jewelled heels and Misao isn't cross-dressing as a boy page. Though why this is a good thing isn't too clear to me.

Woe.

And thus ends the entry intelligible to no one. Except possibly to [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer. I don't think there is a huge Heyer/Kenshin fandoms overlap.
dangermousie: (Max Liz Heatwave by soopie)
Anyone know any delightful, juicy Veronica Mars spoilers? Please? Also, I've missed a week and a half worth of entries which is way too many for me ever to catch up. So if there is anything you think I'll especially like, please point me :)

Just realized that Battlestar Galactica starts this friday. I am afraid I squealed when I saw that. Bought the 2.0 DVDs and delighted with the abundance of podcasts and deleted scenes (though mysteriously none for Pegasus). Fun thing was, ended up talking about BSG at the checkout line both with the clerk (who told me he preferred Trek) and the guy in front of me who said he loved Six (heee) and was thinking of becoming a professional wrestler. Yeah.

Thoughts on deleted scenes )

I also saw the 4+ minute preview of second half. Thoughts on preview )

I am reading The Secret History of Pink Carnation, a novel that is a take-tribute to both The Scarlet Pimpernel and Georgette Heyer. It's not nearly as good as either, but it's not a bad read. The framing story has a grad student researching the mysterious fighter of the French during Napoleonic era known as "The Pink Carnation" whose identity has never been revealed by going through papers of Lord Richard Selwick, a successor to the retired Pimpernel, known as the Purple Gentian. The real story of the novel is of course the story of the Purple Gentian, his spying activities and his interest in one Amy Belcourt (who has a severe obsession with Purple Gentian but isn't much interested in Lord Richard) and other various romps. Yes, we do learn the Pink Carnation's identity.

Thoughts on the book versus Heyer and the REAL Pimpernel )
dangermousie: (Max Liz Heatwave by soopie)
Anyone know any delightful, juicy Veronica Mars spoilers? Please? Also, I've missed a week and a half worth of entries which is way too many for me ever to catch up. So if there is anything you think I'll especially like, please point me :)

Just realized that Battlestar Galactica starts this friday. I am afraid I squealed when I saw that. Bought the 2.0 DVDs and delighted with the abundance of podcasts and deleted scenes (though mysteriously none for Pegasus). Fun thing was, ended up talking about BSG at the checkout line both with the clerk (who told me he preferred Trek) and the guy in front of me who said he loved Six (heee) and was thinking of becoming a professional wrestler. Yeah.

Thoughts on deleted scenes )

I also saw the 4+ minute preview of second half. Thoughts on preview )

I am reading The Secret History of Pink Carnation, a novel that is a take-tribute to both The Scarlet Pimpernel and Georgette Heyer. It's not nearly as good as either, but it's not a bad read. The framing story has a grad student researching the mysterious fighter of the French during Napoleonic era known as "The Pink Carnation" whose identity has never been revealed by going through papers of Lord Richard Selwick, a successor to the retired Pimpernel, known as the Purple Gentian. The real story of the novel is of course the story of the Purple Gentian, his spying activities and his interest in one Amy Belcourt (who has a severe obsession with Purple Gentian but isn't much interested in Lord Richard) and other various romps. Yes, we do learn the Pink Carnation's identity.

Thoughts on the book versus Heyer and the REAL Pimpernel )
dangermousie: (Max Liz Heatwave by soopie)
Anyone know any delightful, juicy Veronica Mars spoilers? Please? Also, I've missed a week and a half worth of entries which is way too many for me ever to catch up. So if there is anything you think I'll especially like, please point me :)

Just realized that Battlestar Galactica starts this friday. I am afraid I squealed when I saw that. Bought the 2.0 DVDs and delighted with the abundance of podcasts and deleted scenes (though mysteriously none for Pegasus). Fun thing was, ended up talking about BSG at the checkout line both with the clerk (who told me he preferred Trek) and the guy in front of me who said he loved Six (heee) and was thinking of becoming a professional wrestler. Yeah.

Thoughts on deleted scenes )

I also saw the 4+ minute preview of second half. Thoughts on preview )

I am reading The Secret History of Pink Carnation, a novel that is a take-tribute to both The Scarlet Pimpernel and Georgette Heyer. It's not nearly as good as either, but it's not a bad read. The framing story has a grad student researching the mysterious fighter of the French during Napoleonic era known as "The Pink Carnation" whose identity has never been revealed by going through papers of Lord Richard Selwick, a successor to the retired Pimpernel, known as the Purple Gentian. The real story of the novel is of course the story of the Purple Gentian, his spying activities and his interest in one Amy Belcourt (who has a severe obsession with Purple Gentian but isn't much interested in Lord Richard) and other various romps. Yes, we do learn the Pink Carnation's identity.

Thoughts on the book versus Heyer and the REAL Pimpernel )
dangermousie: (Michael & Maria)
I've just found some lovely Heyer fanfic.

There are two lovely, lovely stories, one for Devil's Cub and another for Faro's Daughter, that I will link if the author says it's OK (you know who you are, author :)

There's also a marvelous little Friday's Child vignette here. And an AU for that book: here.
dangermousie: (Michael & Maria)
I've just found some lovely Heyer fanfic.

There are two lovely, lovely stories, one for Devil's Cub and another for Faro's Daughter, that I will link if the author says it's OK (you know who you are, author :)

There's also a marvelous little Friday's Child vignette here. And an AU for that book: here.
dangermousie: (Michael & Maria)
I've just found some lovely Heyer fanfic.

There are two lovely, lovely stories, one for Devil's Cub and another for Faro's Daughter, that I will link if the author says it's OK (you know who you are, author :)

There's also a marvelous little Friday's Child vignette here. And an AU for that book: here.
dangermousie: (Scarlett morning-after by viresse_icons)
Anyone else on my friends list a fan of Georgette Heyer?

For those who don't know who she is, GH was an English author who wrote largely in the first half of 20th century. Most of her books were set in Georgian and Regency periods. They are lovely comedies of manners, a 20th century version of Jane Austen. The poor woman is responsible for the usually awful Regency Romance genre, but you shouldn't hold it against her, any more than you should blame Tolkien for the abysmal fantasies populating the B&N shelves. Her novels, while usually having some sort of a romance in there, are much more about societal mores and comedies of manners (yes, I used that phrase again). They make me giggle in delight. Her books will not have impassioned declarations in the rain (characters who go in the rain are likely to catch colds, after all), duels to the death (mostly), or sex (kissing is the most you are going to get). What they will have are wonderful characters you fall in love with who are flawed nontheless (and not because their father abused them as a child), great descriptions of period minutia, and an understanding of love (if it enters at all) as based on compatibility and friendship. And they are hilarious.

So, I heartily recommend her. Here (in no order) are my 10 favorites (this is rather expanded from a heyer comm post):

Cut because long )
dangermousie: (Scarlett morning-after by viresse_icons)
Anyone else on my friends list a fan of Georgette Heyer?

For those who don't know who she is, GH was an English author who wrote largely in the first half of 20th century. Most of her books were set in Georgian and Regency periods. They are lovely comedies of manners, a 20th century version of Jane Austen. The poor woman is responsible for the usually awful Regency Romance genre, but you shouldn't hold it against her, any more than you should blame Tolkien for the abysmal fantasies populating the B&N shelves. Her novels, while usually having some sort of a romance in there, are much more about societal mores and comedies of manners (yes, I used that phrase again). They make me giggle in delight. Her books will not have impassioned declarations in the rain (characters who go in the rain are likely to catch colds, after all), duels to the death (mostly), or sex (kissing is the most you are going to get). What they will have are wonderful characters you fall in love with who are flawed nontheless (and not because their father abused them as a child), great descriptions of period minutia, and an understanding of love (if it enters at all) as based on compatibility and friendship. And they are hilarious.

So, I heartily recommend her. Here (in no order) are my 10 favorites (this is rather expanded from a heyer comm post):

Cut because long )
dangermousie: (Scarlett morning-after by viresse_icons)
Anyone else on my friends list a fan of Georgette Heyer?

For those who don't know who she is, GH was an English author who wrote largely in the first half of 20th century. Most of her books were set in Georgian and Regency periods. They are lovely comedies of manners, a 20th century version of Jane Austen. The poor woman is responsible for the usually awful Regency Romance genre, but you shouldn't hold it against her, any more than you should blame Tolkien for the abysmal fantasies populating the B&N shelves. Her novels, while usually having some sort of a romance in there, are much more about societal mores and comedies of manners (yes, I used that phrase again). They make me giggle in delight. Her books will not have impassioned declarations in the rain (characters who go in the rain are likely to catch colds, after all), duels to the death (mostly), or sex (kissing is the most you are going to get). What they will have are wonderful characters you fall in love with who are flawed nontheless (and not because their father abused them as a child), great descriptions of period minutia, and an understanding of love (if it enters at all) as based on compatibility and friendship. And they are hilarious.

So, I heartily recommend her. Here (in no order) are my 10 favorites (this is rather expanded from a heyer comm post):

Cut because long )

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