dangermousie: (Pick the Stars: facepalm by meganbmoore)
Ah, and now I remember why I gave up on romance novels - blistering hero hate!

I got lulled into security by reading four romances in a row where the heroes were likeable, treating heroine and others around them with respect, and not in need of reform.

But that's all right.

Things are back to normal with Gaelen Foley's Lord of Fire. What an apt name for the novel because that is precisely what I want to do to the hero - stick him into the fire and have some barbeque while he roasts.

OK, let's get down to this hypothetical. You are a young woman and this is your experience with a guy - you first see him presiding over a disgusting dusgusting orgy during which he drags you off against your will (and you fully believes for raping), sticks a pistol between your eyes, and feels you up everywhere against your will. Even when he finds out you are actually the sister-in-law of his mistress, come to fetch her to her sick child, and have never done anything improper or sexual in your life, he still offers you some sex.

Next morning, he tells you that only one of the two, you or your sister-in-law, can go to the sick kid, because he knows you treasure the child and wants to use your weakness for the kid to get you in his clutches.

OK, in this hypothetical, if you are in any way sane, are you going to (a) assume this is a horrible monster who deserves to be castrated and soon the hero of the piece will appear to help you heat the knives or (b) decide that all of this is OK because he's hot and angsty.

If you picked (a), congrats, you are a normal human being. If you picked (b), my condolences, you are Galen Foley.

I am supposed to believe the heroine feels physically drawn to him after that? In what Universe, unless she is a closet BDSM afficionado with a rape fetish?

How on earth the author expects me to root for them as a couple is beyond me. As it is, there is some evil French spy who supposedly wants to off our "hero" and I keep hoping he will succeed. I mean, when "hero" was relieving his hideous torture at French dude's hands, my reaction was not "poor woobie" but a "serves you right, you bastard!" and a fierce desire that the French Dude do it again.

This is all the more disappointing because the reason I got this sick-making book was because I finished Foley's The Duke and really enjoyed it - the hero *gasp* had morals, was in no need of reform, and actually listened when heroine told him "no".

Now excuse me, I need to go barf.
dangermousie: (Pick the Stars: facepalm by meganbmoore)
Ah, and now I remember why I gave up on romance novels - blistering hero hate!

I got lulled into security by reading four romances in a row where the heroes were likeable, treating heroine and others around them with respect, and not in need of reform.

But that's all right.

Things are back to normal with Gaelen Foley's Lord of Fire. What an apt name for the novel because that is precisely what I want to do to the hero - stick him into the fire and have some barbeque while he roasts.

OK, let's get down to this hypothetical. You are a young woman and this is your experience with a guy - you first see him presiding over a disgusting dusgusting orgy during which he drags you off against your will (and you fully believes for raping), sticks a pistol between your eyes, and feels you up everywhere against your will. Even when he finds out you are actually the sister-in-law of his mistress, come to fetch her to her sick child, and have never done anything improper or sexual in your life, he still offers you some sex.

Next morning, he tells you that only one of the two, you or your sister-in-law, can go to the sick kid, because he knows you treasure the child and wants to use your weakness for the kid to get you in his clutches.

OK, in this hypothetical, if you are in any way sane, are you going to (a) assume this is a horrible monster who deserves to be castrated and soon the hero of the piece will appear to help you heat the knives or (b) decide that all of this is OK because he's hot and angsty.

If you picked (a), congrats, you are a normal human being. If you picked (b), my condolences, you are Galen Foley.

I am supposed to believe the heroine feels physically drawn to him after that? In what Universe, unless she is a closet BDSM afficionado with a rape fetish?

How on earth the author expects me to root for them as a couple is beyond me. As it is, there is some evil French spy who supposedly wants to off our "hero" and I keep hoping he will succeed. I mean, when "hero" was relieving his hideous torture at French dude's hands, my reaction was not "poor woobie" but a "serves you right, you bastard!" and a fierce desire that the French Dude do it again.

This is all the more disappointing because the reason I got this sick-making book was because I finished Foley's The Duke and really enjoyed it - the hero *gasp* had morals, was in no need of reform, and actually listened when heroine told him "no".

Now excuse me, I need to go barf.
dangermousie: (Pick the Stars: facepalm by meganbmoore)
Ah, and now I remember why I gave up on romance novels - blistering hero hate!

I got lulled into security by reading four romances in a row where the heroes were likeable, treating heroine and others around them with respect, and not in need of reform.

But that's all right.

Things are back to normal with Gaelen Foley's Lord of Fire. What an apt name for the novel because that is precisely what I want to do to the hero - stick him into the fire and have some barbeque while he roasts.

OK, let's get down to this hypothetical. You are a young woman and this is your experience with a guy - you first see him presiding over a disgusting dusgusting orgy during which he drags you off against your will (and you fully believes for raping), sticks a pistol between your eyes, and feels you up everywhere against your will. Even when he finds out you are actually the sister-in-law of his mistress, come to fetch her to her sick child, and have never done anything improper or sexual in your life, he still offers you some sex.

Next morning, he tells you that only one of the two, you or your sister-in-law, can go to the sick kid, because he knows you treasure the child and wants to use your weakness for the kid to get you in his clutches.

OK, in this hypothetical, if you are in any way sane, are you going to (a) assume this is a horrible monster who deserves to be castrated and soon the hero of the piece will appear to help you heat the knives or (b) decide that all of this is OK because he's hot and angsty.

If you picked (a), congrats, you are a normal human being. If you picked (b), my condolences, you are Galen Foley.

I am supposed to believe the heroine feels physically drawn to him after that? In what Universe, unless she is a closet BDSM afficionado with a rape fetish?

How on earth the author expects me to root for them as a couple is beyond me. As it is, there is some evil French spy who supposedly wants to off our "hero" and I keep hoping he will succeed. I mean, when "hero" was relieving his hideous torture at French dude's hands, my reaction was not "poor woobie" but a "serves you right, you bastard!" and a fierce desire that the French Dude do it again.

This is all the more disappointing because the reason I got this sick-making book was because I finished Foley's The Duke and really enjoyed it - the hero *gasp* had morals, was in no need of reform, and actually listened when heroine told him "no".

Now excuse me, I need to go barf.

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November 2012

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