dangermousie: (Default)
I don't know why, but I went looking for Gone with the Wind MVs on youtube this morning.

I found tons. It's a little weird to see GWTW with modern songs, but nontheless some of the vids are awesome. I love this one especially:



But more than that, it actually reminded me how much I love the movie and the book. I remember first reading the book when I was 12-13 and gulping it down like mad. It was one of the earliest books I read where the heroine and hero were very flawed, not in any way paragons (when I was little, I read classics and Soviet literature, and both lacked in that). It was rather a revelation. And of course I should have figured out my lingering preference for angst and dysfunctional/passionate fictional relationships when I fell so much for Scarlett/Rhett in their totally messed-up glory. I always get boggled when people say they want something like that. It's passionate and awesome to read about, but it's also fucked up beyond words and both of them are damaged individuals. I love reading/watching that stuff but would loathe it in RL.

And the ending? Still drives me crazy. Not crazy enough to read 'Scarlett' though.

And the movie is one of those rare instances where a book I love has been adopted into a movie I love equally. They all look the way I imagined and mmmm...chemistry. Plus, I totally love the scene where Rhett cries over Scarlett. Back then, movie men never ever cried, and especially not hyper-masculine men like Clark Gable's characters. So YUM. (Yes, clearly, I was meant for kdramas, where masculine men weeping is the raison d'etre).

I love classic movies in general, but some of them (like the one I discuss below) have clearly badly dated in its film techniques, story pacing, etc. But I don't think GWTW has (except in its attitude to slave-holding, of course, but as this is the narrative of that particular culture, I can't really object to it any more than I can object to an ancient Roman comedy which has slaves, or an eighteenth-century novel which thinks women are the weaker sex).

Anyway, still being caught in jetlag, I also watched In Old Chicago, a 1937 movie about the 1871 Chicago fire, with a total melodrama story around it. I confess to spending my time thinking it would make an awesome kdrama: it had the nascent 'other girl' and 'other guy' even :)

The story pits two brothers against each other: one is an honest lawyer, Jack (Don Ameche), and another a rogue, Dion (Tyrone Power, much too good-looking to be allowed). Dion starts a super-successful saloon with an 'entertainer' Belle (Alice Faye) and Jack gets elected mayor and decides to clean the city up, which means all of Dion's businesses. Who will prevail? Will Dion reform? Will Belle get that wedding ring she wants? Will I stop ogling Tyrone Power? (The answer to that last one is a clear 'no.')

The movie was a great deal of fun for under two hours. The costumes were great, the soundtrack awesome, and I loved the shady-push/pull relationship between Belle and Dion, who clearly ran a business together, and clearly lived together 'in sin'. It's just as clear, Belle has quite a past and is no blushing virgin when she hooks up with Dion. They liked each other so much because both were hard-headedly and cheerfully 'unvirtuous' and business-oriented, plus very physically compatible. I am amused to note that Dion stalks Belle in the beginning not because out of passion for her hot self but because of passion for a piece of property she has.

Not all is roses with the movie, though. Unlike some other movies from 1930s (GWTW, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town etc), IOC has rather dated in many many many respects, and I am not talking about the fire scenes which are actually pretty good. I admit to cringing at the song 'In Old Virginny,' performed by Belle. I know it's a song appropriate for/popular during the period but if I rolled my eyes any harder, they would fall out (yeah, yeah, faithful old slave is dying to go meet his 'Massa' in heaven. WTF?). More importantly than that, I ended up being on Dion's side and not Jack's which is sort of a huge problem when a movie's message is that Jack s right, Dion is wrong. When they kept talking about vice/virtue and honest womanhood, all I kept thinking are the stuffy Victorian morals I am not keen on at all, and under which Belle is clearly better off having 10 kids and not running a saloon. Ugh. Plus, Dion actually looked like he had fun.

So color me displeased but unsurprised by Dion's last minute change of heart and repentance (was it even that? It's not like he decided Jack was right and saloons were evil. But he would of course pick his brother over saloons, which would burn anyway. He is a rogue not a monster). After all, in a lot of 1930s movies, you either reformed or died. Ditto for Belle's sudden desire to be a virtuous wife and mother. Hmmmm. I find it ironically appropriate the movie ends with Jack burned to a crisp and Belle and Dion all sooty and clutching each other. They seem like suvivors and I bet when they get involved in the rebuilding of Chicago, not everything they will do will be super-virtuous. Thanks God. If this was real, I'd say it's also good they ended when they did because someone is going to knife Dion after the fire is over, for helping Jack. Hmmm...I am analyzing it too much. Just watch it for Tyrone Power's hotness.

I also wonder if there is a whole subgenre of movies about natural disasters reforming saloon keepers who are in love with singers, after their virtuous friend keels over. I mean, there is this, and there is San Francisco, with Clark Gable and Jeanette McDonald (very suited to their roles as a hard-bitten jerk and prim Victorian singer).
dangermousie: (Default)
I don't know why, but I went looking for Gone with the Wind MVs on youtube this morning.

I found tons. It's a little weird to see GWTW with modern songs, but nontheless some of the vids are awesome. I love this one especially:



But more than that, it actually reminded me how much I love the movie and the book. I remember first reading the book when I was 12-13 and gulping it down like mad. It was one of the earliest books I read where the heroine and hero were very flawed, not in any way paragons (when I was little, I read classics and Soviet literature, and both lacked in that). It was rather a revelation. And of course I should have figured out my lingering preference for angst and dysfunctional/passionate fictional relationships when I fell so much for Scarlett/Rhett in their totally messed-up glory. I always get boggled when people say they want something like that. It's passionate and awesome to read about, but it's also fucked up beyond words and both of them are damaged individuals. I love reading/watching that stuff but would loathe it in RL.

And the ending? Still drives me crazy. Not crazy enough to read 'Scarlett' though.

And the movie is one of those rare instances where a book I love has been adopted into a movie I love equally. They all look the way I imagined and mmmm...chemistry. Plus, I totally love the scene where Rhett cries over Scarlett. Back then, movie men never ever cried, and especially not hyper-masculine men like Clark Gable's characters. So YUM. (Yes, clearly, I was meant for kdramas, where masculine men weeping is the raison d'etre).

I love classic movies in general, but some of them (like the one I discuss below) have clearly badly dated in its film techniques, story pacing, etc. But I don't think GWTW has (except in its attitude to slave-holding, of course, but as this is the narrative of that particular culture, I can't really object to it any more than I can object to an ancient Roman comedy which has slaves, or an eighteenth-century novel which thinks women are the weaker sex).

Anyway, still being caught in jetlag, I also watched In Old Chicago, a 1937 movie about the 1871 Chicago fire, with a total melodrama story around it. I confess to spending my time thinking it would make an awesome kdrama: it had the nascent 'other girl' and 'other guy' even :)

The story pits two brothers against each other: one is an honest lawyer, Jack (Don Ameche), and another a rogue, Dion (Tyrone Power, much too good-looking to be allowed). Dion starts a super-successful saloon with an 'entertainer' Belle (Alice Faye) and Jack gets elected mayor and decides to clean the city up, which means all of Dion's businesses. Who will prevail? Will Dion reform? Will Belle get that wedding ring she wants? Will I stop ogling Tyrone Power? (The answer to that last one is a clear 'no.')

The movie was a great deal of fun for under two hours. The costumes were great, the soundtrack awesome, and I loved the shady-push/pull relationship between Belle and Dion, who clearly ran a business together, and clearly lived together 'in sin'. It's just as clear, Belle has quite a past and is no blushing virgin when she hooks up with Dion. They liked each other so much because both were hard-headedly and cheerfully 'unvirtuous' and business-oriented, plus very physically compatible. I am amused to note that Dion stalks Belle in the beginning not because out of passion for her hot self but because of passion for a piece of property she has.

Not all is roses with the movie, though. Unlike some other movies from 1930s (GWTW, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town etc), IOC has rather dated in many many many respects, and I am not talking about the fire scenes which are actually pretty good. I admit to cringing at the song 'In Old Virginny,' performed by Belle. I know it's a song appropriate for/popular during the period but if I rolled my eyes any harder, they would fall out (yeah, yeah, faithful old slave is dying to go meet his 'Massa' in heaven. WTF?). More importantly than that, I ended up being on Dion's side and not Jack's which is sort of a huge problem when a movie's message is that Jack s right, Dion is wrong. When they kept talking about vice/virtue and honest womanhood, all I kept thinking are the stuffy Victorian morals I am not keen on at all, and under which Belle is clearly better off having 10 kids and not running a saloon. Ugh. Plus, Dion actually looked like he had fun.

So color me displeased but unsurprised by Dion's last minute change of heart and repentance (was it even that? It's not like he decided Jack was right and saloons were evil. But he would of course pick his brother over saloons, which would burn anyway. He is a rogue not a monster). After all, in a lot of 1930s movies, you either reformed or died. Ditto for Belle's sudden desire to be a virtuous wife and mother. Hmmmm. I find it ironically appropriate the movie ends with Jack burned to a crisp and Belle and Dion all sooty and clutching each other. They seem like suvivors and I bet when they get involved in the rebuilding of Chicago, not everything they will do will be super-virtuous. Thanks God. If this was real, I'd say it's also good they ended when they did because someone is going to knife Dion after the fire is over, for helping Jack. Hmmm...I am analyzing it too much. Just watch it for Tyrone Power's hotness.

I also wonder if there is a whole subgenre of movies about natural disasters reforming saloon keepers who are in love with singers, after their virtuous friend keels over. I mean, there is this, and there is San Francisco, with Clark Gable and Jeanette McDonald (very suited to their roles as a hard-bitten jerk and prim Victorian singer).
dangermousie: (Default)
I don't know why, but I went looking for Gone with the Wind MVs on youtube this morning.

I found tons. It's a little weird to see GWTW with modern songs, but nontheless some of the vids are awesome. I love this one especially:



But more than that, it actually reminded me how much I love the movie and the book. I remember first reading the book when I was 12-13 and gulping it down like mad. It was one of the earliest books I read where the heroine and hero were very flawed, not in any way paragons (when I was little, I read classics and Soviet literature, and both lacked in that). It was rather a revelation. And of course I should have figured out my lingering preference for angst and dysfunctional/passionate fictional relationships when I fell so much for Scarlett/Rhett in their totally messed-up glory. I always get boggled when people say they want something like that. It's passionate and awesome to read about, but it's also fucked up beyond words and both of them are damaged individuals. I love reading/watching that stuff but would loathe it in RL.

And the ending? Still drives me crazy. Not crazy enough to read 'Scarlett' though.

And the movie is one of those rare instances where a book I love has been adopted into a movie I love equally. They all look the way I imagined and mmmm...chemistry. Plus, I totally love the scene where Rhett cries over Scarlett. Back then, movie men never ever cried, and especially not hyper-masculine men like Clark Gable's characters. So YUM. (Yes, clearly, I was meant for kdramas, where masculine men weeping is the raison d'etre).

I love classic movies in general, but some of them (like the one I discuss below) have clearly badly dated in its film techniques, story pacing, etc. But I don't think GWTW has (except in its attitude to slave-holding, of course, but as this is the narrative of that particular culture, I can't really object to it any more than I can object to an ancient Roman comedy which has slaves, or an eighteenth-century novel which thinks women are the weaker sex).

Anyway, still being caught in jetlag, I also watched In Old Chicago, a 1937 movie about the 1871 Chicago fire, with a total melodrama story around it. I confess to spending my time thinking it would make an awesome kdrama: it had the nascent 'other girl' and 'other guy' even :)

The story pits two brothers against each other: one is an honest lawyer, Jack (Don Ameche), and another a rogue, Dion (Tyrone Power, much too good-looking to be allowed). Dion starts a super-successful saloon with an 'entertainer' Belle (Alice Faye) and Jack gets elected mayor and decides to clean the city up, which means all of Dion's businesses. Who will prevail? Will Dion reform? Will Belle get that wedding ring she wants? Will I stop ogling Tyrone Power? (The answer to that last one is a clear 'no.')

The movie was a great deal of fun for under two hours. The costumes were great, the soundtrack awesome, and I loved the shady-push/pull relationship between Belle and Dion, who clearly ran a business together, and clearly lived together 'in sin'. It's just as clear, Belle has quite a past and is no blushing virgin when she hooks up with Dion. They liked each other so much because both were hard-headedly and cheerfully 'unvirtuous' and business-oriented, plus very physically compatible. I am amused to note that Dion stalks Belle in the beginning not because out of passion for her hot self but because of passion for a piece of property she has.

Not all is roses with the movie, though. Unlike some other movies from 1930s (GWTW, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town etc), IOC has rather dated in many many many respects, and I am not talking about the fire scenes which are actually pretty good. I admit to cringing at the song 'In Old Virginny,' performed by Belle. I know it's a song appropriate for/popular during the period but if I rolled my eyes any harder, they would fall out (yeah, yeah, faithful old slave is dying to go meet his 'Massa' in heaven. WTF?). More importantly than that, I ended up being on Dion's side and not Jack's which is sort of a huge problem when a movie's message is that Jack s right, Dion is wrong. When they kept talking about vice/virtue and honest womanhood, all I kept thinking are the stuffy Victorian morals I am not keen on at all, and under which Belle is clearly better off having 10 kids and not running a saloon. Ugh. Plus, Dion actually looked like he had fun.

So color me displeased but unsurprised by Dion's last minute change of heart and repentance (was it even that? It's not like he decided Jack was right and saloons were evil. But he would of course pick his brother over saloons, which would burn anyway. He is a rogue not a monster). After all, in a lot of 1930s movies, you either reformed or died. Ditto for Belle's sudden desire to be a virtuous wife and mother. Hmmmm. I find it ironically appropriate the movie ends with Jack burned to a crisp and Belle and Dion all sooty and clutching each other. They seem like suvivors and I bet when they get involved in the rebuilding of Chicago, not everything they will do will be super-virtuous. Thanks God. If this was real, I'd say it's also good they ended when they did because someone is going to knife Dion after the fire is over, for helping Jack. Hmmm...I am analyzing it too much. Just watch it for Tyrone Power's hotness.

I also wonder if there is a whole subgenre of movies about natural disasters reforming saloon keepers who are in love with singers, after their virtuous friend keels over. I mean, there is this, and there is San Francisco, with Clark Gable and Jeanette McDonald (very suited to their roles as a hard-bitten jerk and prim Victorian singer).
dangermousie: (Rhett by aurora1357)
Looking at the amazon reviews for Gone With The Wind (the movie), I was interested to note, that WB has cheated us in their new collector's-edition DVD by:

a. Not presenting the movie in a wide-screen format (except for the minor problem of it not existing at the time!)

b. Not having Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh do a commentary on the movie (which would have been delightful indeed, except for the insignificant fact of the two of them being dead for 40 or so years).

Also, did you know that Gone With The Wind is all about the right to bear arms and the rightness of distrusting the government? Me neither.

In addition, Gone With The Wind sucks as a comedy. It's not very funny. Of course, that is if you assume it's supposed to be one. Personally, I find civil wars, starvation, loss of a child, and a really destructive relationship hilarious...
dangermousie: (Rhett by aurora1357)
Looking at the amazon reviews for Gone With The Wind (the movie), I was interested to note, that WB has cheated us in their new collector's-edition DVD by:

a. Not presenting the movie in a wide-screen format (except for the minor problem of it not existing at the time!)

b. Not having Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh do a commentary on the movie (which would have been delightful indeed, except for the insignificant fact of the two of them being dead for 40 or so years).

Also, did you know that Gone With The Wind is all about the right to bear arms and the rightness of distrusting the government? Me neither.

In addition, Gone With The Wind sucks as a comedy. It's not very funny. Of course, that is if you assume it's supposed to be one. Personally, I find civil wars, starvation, loss of a child, and a really destructive relationship hilarious...
dangermousie: (Rhett by aurora1357)
Looking at the amazon reviews for Gone With The Wind (the movie), I was interested to note, that WB has cheated us in their new collector's-edition DVD by:

a. Not presenting the movie in a wide-screen format (except for the minor problem of it not existing at the time!)

b. Not having Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh do a commentary on the movie (which would have been delightful indeed, except for the insignificant fact of the two of them being dead for 40 or so years).

Also, did you know that Gone With The Wind is all about the right to bear arms and the rightness of distrusting the government? Me neither.

In addition, Gone With The Wind sucks as a comedy. It's not very funny. Of course, that is if you assume it's supposed to be one. Personally, I find civil wars, starvation, loss of a child, and a really destructive relationship hilarious...
dangermousie: (Scarlett-Rhett by viresse_icons)
Really, one of the most frustrating things about that book (and movie) is that ambiguous ending. Will she get him back? Will he let her? What? It bugged me when I first read the book (in tandem with my Mom) at 12. It bugs me now, 15+ years later. I need to know, and no, the atrocious "Scarlett" is not a good answer.

You just reread the whole damn book hoping for the two of them to get their act together at the same time and of course it never happens. There are two moments especially that drive me up the wall.

The first is the "morning after" (well, in the book it's a day+ after, isn't it?), after the whole "carry her to bed and make passionate love to her till morning" scene. Because this is totally Rhett's effort, in his severely messed-up way, to do the best he can and be the best lover ever and really try to please her and maybe that way she'll forget about Ashley and he can show her through his body what he can never say to her (yes, the two of them could keep shrinks happy for years) and the awful thing is it works. She is totally into him (OK, bad choice of words) after that, but then he comes back and....argh!

Basically, I want to take the two of them and smash their heads against the wall. As in "Can't you tell he is shaking in his shoes?" and "can't you tell she is devastated because she thinks you left her bed to go to Belle?" Argh! Especially since he tells her at the end that if she made any move at that point, he would have fallen to his knees and kissed her feet. Argh! I love my angst, but when it has a happy ending, dammit!

And of course the whole miscarriage scene. When she wants him and calls for him but there isn't anyone to hear her, and meanwhile he is falling apart because she doesn't want him (btw, Clark Gable crying? Hot). I remember yelling at the book at that point :D Seriously, this is enough to make you want to read "Scarlett." Almost.
dangermousie: (Scarlett-Rhett by viresse_icons)
Really, one of the most frustrating things about that book (and movie) is that ambiguous ending. Will she get him back? Will he let her? What? It bugged me when I first read the book (in tandem with my Mom) at 12. It bugs me now, 15+ years later. I need to know, and no, the atrocious "Scarlett" is not a good answer.

You just reread the whole damn book hoping for the two of them to get their act together at the same time and of course it never happens. There are two moments especially that drive me up the wall.

The first is the "morning after" (well, in the book it's a day+ after, isn't it?), after the whole "carry her to bed and make passionate love to her till morning" scene. Because this is totally Rhett's effort, in his severely messed-up way, to do the best he can and be the best lover ever and really try to please her and maybe that way she'll forget about Ashley and he can show her through his body what he can never say to her (yes, the two of them could keep shrinks happy for years) and the awful thing is it works. She is totally into him (OK, bad choice of words) after that, but then he comes back and....argh!

Basically, I want to take the two of them and smash their heads against the wall. As in "Can't you tell he is shaking in his shoes?" and "can't you tell she is devastated because she thinks you left her bed to go to Belle?" Argh! Especially since he tells her at the end that if she made any move at that point, he would have fallen to his knees and kissed her feet. Argh! I love my angst, but when it has a happy ending, dammit!

And of course the whole miscarriage scene. When she wants him and calls for him but there isn't anyone to hear her, and meanwhile he is falling apart because she doesn't want him (btw, Clark Gable crying? Hot). I remember yelling at the book at that point :D Seriously, this is enough to make you want to read "Scarlett." Almost.
dangermousie: (Scarlett-Rhett by viresse_icons)
Really, one of the most frustrating things about that book (and movie) is that ambiguous ending. Will she get him back? Will he let her? What? It bugged me when I first read the book (in tandem with my Mom) at 12. It bugs me now, 15+ years later. I need to know, and no, the atrocious "Scarlett" is not a good answer.

You just reread the whole damn book hoping for the two of them to get their act together at the same time and of course it never happens. There are two moments especially that drive me up the wall.

The first is the "morning after" (well, in the book it's a day+ after, isn't it?), after the whole "carry her to bed and make passionate love to her till morning" scene. Because this is totally Rhett's effort, in his severely messed-up way, to do the best he can and be the best lover ever and really try to please her and maybe that way she'll forget about Ashley and he can show her through his body what he can never say to her (yes, the two of them could keep shrinks happy for years) and the awful thing is it works. She is totally into him (OK, bad choice of words) after that, but then he comes back and....argh!

Basically, I want to take the two of them and smash their heads against the wall. As in "Can't you tell he is shaking in his shoes?" and "can't you tell she is devastated because she thinks you left her bed to go to Belle?" Argh! Especially since he tells her at the end that if she made any move at that point, he would have fallen to his knees and kissed her feet. Argh! I love my angst, but when it has a happy ending, dammit!

And of course the whole miscarriage scene. When she wants him and calls for him but there isn't anyone to hear her, and meanwhile he is falling apart because she doesn't want him (btw, Clark Gable crying? Hot). I remember yelling at the book at that point :D Seriously, this is enough to make you want to read "Scarlett." Almost.
dangermousie: (Scarlett morning-after by viresse_icons)
I spent a solid chunk of the weekend wallowing in GWTW: 4 discs of a four hour movie (some scenes of which need to be rewatched and repeated "kiss, me Scarlett...once") plus really fun documentaries would do that to you (btw, Clark Gable? *Moan*). Then I went to ff.net to look for fanfic (which was shockingly under "movies" and not "books."). There wasn't much, and none of it (at least from the summaries) looked dreadful. And so I was forced to imagine what would happen if the movie was released now, as opposed to 60+ years ago, with the same conditions (as in "biggest grosser of all time, with the biggest male star and the publicity-hyped beauty in the lead"). Hmmmm...

* Rhett/Ashley slash. Lots of it. To the feedback that this is a Scarlett/Rhett in the original, the authors would reply that the repliers are homophobes. Besides, OMG, didn't you see Rhett carry unconscious Ashley in his arms. There was so something there!
* There would be a few hardcore Ashley/Scarlett shippers who would have happy flame wars with Rhett/Scarlett shippers.
* Someone would write a 50-chapter, 900-page continuation and BNFs would flock to it, saying that the author understood the characters so much better than Margaret Mitchell.
*Book-only fans would come by and flame authors who've based their fanfic only on the movies, saying they are ignoramuses, and that Mitchell's explanation about baked beans on p. 468 is crucial to the whole understanding of GWTW.
* Mary Sues of all varieties: impoverished but noble belles, Northern gentlewomen, teenyboppers thrust back through time. They will be mostly after Rhett (who would have realized he never cared for that stupid Scarlett after all, especially by the time Mary Sue got out her electric guitar and fed her unicorn), but there will be a spillover to console Ashley, make happy Frank and Charles who never died, and even many of the book's characters who were never in the movie.
* Deathfic. You think Sherman took a heavy toll on the South? Just you wait until the fanfic authors will get their hands on the story.
*Scarlett will contemplate her feelings on Rhett/Ashley/Melanie/the neighbor's cat to the tune of Britney Spears' latest.
* Various Mary Sues bring Rhett and Scarlett together, and/or they engage in a lot of reconciliation PWP sex (on second thoughts, hmmmmmmm.....)
* People write RP stories about Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland etc. When other people object, saying that in all likelyhood Clark Gable never took Vivien Leigh/Leslie Howard/Olivia de Havilland/the second unit director on a romantic parachute tour of Brazil as they were being hunted by the evil serial killers and engaged in lots of sex, the RP-people will object, calling their critics narrow-minded as "OMG it is clearly fiction."
* AUs. Lots of AUs. That way the author will have to do no research. Make Rhett an important doctor and Scarlett the new intern. Throw common sense out of the window. See it fly!
*Mpreg. *shudder* You thought Rhett was a good father before?

Heeee. Love my new "morning after" icon. Judging by that grin, Rhett wasn't too bad :D
dangermousie: (Scarlett morning-after by viresse_icons)
I spent a solid chunk of the weekend wallowing in GWTW: 4 discs of a four hour movie (some scenes of which need to be rewatched and repeated "kiss, me Scarlett...once") plus really fun documentaries would do that to you (btw, Clark Gable? *Moan*). Then I went to ff.net to look for fanfic (which was shockingly under "movies" and not "books."). There wasn't much, and none of it (at least from the summaries) looked dreadful. And so I was forced to imagine what would happen if the movie was released now, as opposed to 60+ years ago, with the same conditions (as in "biggest grosser of all time, with the biggest male star and the publicity-hyped beauty in the lead"). Hmmmm...

* Rhett/Ashley slash. Lots of it. To the feedback that this is a Scarlett/Rhett in the original, the authors would reply that the repliers are homophobes. Besides, OMG, didn't you see Rhett carry unconscious Ashley in his arms. There was so something there!
* There would be a few hardcore Ashley/Scarlett shippers who would have happy flame wars with Rhett/Scarlett shippers.
* Someone would write a 50-chapter, 900-page continuation and BNFs would flock to it, saying that the author understood the characters so much better than Margaret Mitchell.
*Book-only fans would come by and flame authors who've based their fanfic only on the movies, saying they are ignoramuses, and that Mitchell's explanation about baked beans on p. 468 is crucial to the whole understanding of GWTW.
* Mary Sues of all varieties: impoverished but noble belles, Northern gentlewomen, teenyboppers thrust back through time. They will be mostly after Rhett (who would have realized he never cared for that stupid Scarlett after all, especially by the time Mary Sue got out her electric guitar and fed her unicorn), but there will be a spillover to console Ashley, make happy Frank and Charles who never died, and even many of the book's characters who were never in the movie.
* Deathfic. You think Sherman took a heavy toll on the South? Just you wait until the fanfic authors will get their hands on the story.
*Scarlett will contemplate her feelings on Rhett/Ashley/Melanie/the neighbor's cat to the tune of Britney Spears' latest.
* Various Mary Sues bring Rhett and Scarlett together, and/or they engage in a lot of reconciliation PWP sex (on second thoughts, hmmmmmmm.....)
* People write RP stories about Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland etc. When other people object, saying that in all likelyhood Clark Gable never took Vivien Leigh/Leslie Howard/Olivia de Havilland/the second unit director on a romantic parachute tour of Brazil as they were being hunted by the evil serial killers and engaged in lots of sex, the RP-people will object, calling their critics narrow-minded as "OMG it is clearly fiction."
* AUs. Lots of AUs. That way the author will have to do no research. Make Rhett an important doctor and Scarlett the new intern. Throw common sense out of the window. See it fly!
*Mpreg. *shudder* You thought Rhett was a good father before?

Heeee. Love my new "morning after" icon. Judging by that grin, Rhett wasn't too bad :D
dangermousie: (Scarlett morning-after by viresse_icons)
I spent a solid chunk of the weekend wallowing in GWTW: 4 discs of a four hour movie (some scenes of which need to be rewatched and repeated "kiss, me Scarlett...once") plus really fun documentaries would do that to you (btw, Clark Gable? *Moan*). Then I went to ff.net to look for fanfic (which was shockingly under "movies" and not "books."). There wasn't much, and none of it (at least from the summaries) looked dreadful. And so I was forced to imagine what would happen if the movie was released now, as opposed to 60+ years ago, with the same conditions (as in "biggest grosser of all time, with the biggest male star and the publicity-hyped beauty in the lead"). Hmmmm...

* Rhett/Ashley slash. Lots of it. To the feedback that this is a Scarlett/Rhett in the original, the authors would reply that the repliers are homophobes. Besides, OMG, didn't you see Rhett carry unconscious Ashley in his arms. There was so something there!
* There would be a few hardcore Ashley/Scarlett shippers who would have happy flame wars with Rhett/Scarlett shippers.
* Someone would write a 50-chapter, 900-page continuation and BNFs would flock to it, saying that the author understood the characters so much better than Margaret Mitchell.
*Book-only fans would come by and flame authors who've based their fanfic only on the movies, saying they are ignoramuses, and that Mitchell's explanation about baked beans on p. 468 is crucial to the whole understanding of GWTW.
* Mary Sues of all varieties: impoverished but noble belles, Northern gentlewomen, teenyboppers thrust back through time. They will be mostly after Rhett (who would have realized he never cared for that stupid Scarlett after all, especially by the time Mary Sue got out her electric guitar and fed her unicorn), but there will be a spillover to console Ashley, make happy Frank and Charles who never died, and even many of the book's characters who were never in the movie.
* Deathfic. You think Sherman took a heavy toll on the South? Just you wait until the fanfic authors will get their hands on the story.
*Scarlett will contemplate her feelings on Rhett/Ashley/Melanie/the neighbor's cat to the tune of Britney Spears' latest.
* Various Mary Sues bring Rhett and Scarlett together, and/or they engage in a lot of reconciliation PWP sex (on second thoughts, hmmmmmmm.....)
* People write RP stories about Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland etc. When other people object, saying that in all likelyhood Clark Gable never took Vivien Leigh/Leslie Howard/Olivia de Havilland/the second unit director on a romantic parachute tour of Brazil as they were being hunted by the evil serial killers and engaged in lots of sex, the RP-people will object, calling their critics narrow-minded as "OMG it is clearly fiction."
* AUs. Lots of AUs. That way the author will have to do no research. Make Rhett an important doctor and Scarlett the new intern. Throw common sense out of the window. See it fly!
*Mpreg. *shudder* You thought Rhett was a good father before?

Heeee. Love my new "morning after" icon. Judging by that grin, Rhett wasn't too bad :D
dangermousie: (Bunty aur Babli)
Ihave more "brilliant" observations on BSG, but for now I am watching my new, just-bought 4-disc special edition of Gone With The Wind.

"Tonight's one night you are not turning me out." OK, if you say so. Take me, Rhett, I am yours...

I need a GWTW icon.
dangermousie: (Bunty aur Babli)
Ihave more "brilliant" observations on BSG, but for now I am watching my new, just-bought 4-disc special edition of Gone With The Wind.

"Tonight's one night you are not turning me out." OK, if you say so. Take me, Rhett, I am yours...

I need a GWTW icon.
dangermousie: (Bunty aur Babli)
Ihave more "brilliant" observations on BSG, but for now I am watching my new, just-bought 4-disc special edition of Gone With The Wind.

"Tonight's one night you are not turning me out." OK, if you say so. Take me, Rhett, I am yours...

I need a GWTW icon.

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November 2012

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