dangermousie: (Song Hye-Kyo by miss-dian)
Reason 1675 why I love Mr. Mousie:

We are having dinner in a Vietnamese restaurant and I am complaining about the fact that I haven't haircut in entirely too long and as proof, I pull my bangs until they end up all the way down to the tip of my nose. He laughs and the following conversation ensues:

Cut for extreme geekiness )

We hit Barnes & Noble afterwards and I was most amused:

1. I found (and yes, bought) a novel which managed to turn Joan, 'Fair Maid of Kent' (mother of Richard II, wife of the Black Prince. If you are not into history, you are most likely to remember him as the character played by James Purefoy in A Knight's Tale) into a romantic heroine. I totally got it. It's not often you come across Edward the Black Prince novels :D

2. There was a book hideously entitled 'Stand Up history of French Revolution." Apparently standing up involved comparing Camille Desmoulins to Richard Federer and imagining what would happen if Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie led the revolution in America (whaaaaaa?)

3. There was a book entitled "The Physics of Buffyverse" which made me full of glee.

4. [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer, you'll be happy to know, I almost got Punch!. It looked awesome. I'll definitely get it later.

5. I found a manga volume of Tramps Like Us, which is the manga that was turned into Kimi Wa Petto jdrama. Amusingly, the guy even looked like MatsuJun. Speaking of that, should I watch the drama? I confess the concept really freaks me out (says the girl who is eagerly looking towards MatsuJun acting out twincest). Human pets? Twincest I can deal with. Power imbalance like that in a relationship is a bit too dom/sub for me. Is it good? Is it too freaky? Should I watch it? I am veeeeery tempted.

6. I got the sequel to Twilight. YES.

And last but not least! Hanadan is dling! YES!
dangermousie: (Song Hye-Kyo by miss-dian)
Reason 1675 why I love Mr. Mousie:

We are having dinner in a Vietnamese restaurant and I am complaining about the fact that I haven't haircut in entirely too long and as proof, I pull my bangs until they end up all the way down to the tip of my nose. He laughs and the following conversation ensues:

Cut for extreme geekiness )

We hit Barnes & Noble afterwards and I was most amused:

1. I found (and yes, bought) a novel which managed to turn Joan, 'Fair Maid of Kent' (mother of Richard II, wife of the Black Prince. If you are not into history, you are most likely to remember him as the character played by James Purefoy in A Knight's Tale) into a romantic heroine. I totally got it. It's not often you come across Edward the Black Prince novels :D

2. There was a book hideously entitled 'Stand Up history of French Revolution." Apparently standing up involved comparing Camille Desmoulins to Richard Federer and imagining what would happen if Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie led the revolution in America (whaaaaaa?)

3. There was a book entitled "The Physics of Buffyverse" which made me full of glee.

4. [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer, you'll be happy to know, I almost got Punch!. It looked awesome. I'll definitely get it later.

5. I found a manga volume of Tramps Like Us, which is the manga that was turned into Kimi Wa Petto jdrama. Amusingly, the guy even looked like MatsuJun. Speaking of that, should I watch the drama? I confess the concept really freaks me out (says the girl who is eagerly looking towards MatsuJun acting out twincest). Human pets? Twincest I can deal with. Power imbalance like that in a relationship is a bit too dom/sub for me. Is it good? Is it too freaky? Should I watch it? I am veeeeery tempted.

6. I got the sequel to Twilight. YES.

And last but not least! Hanadan is dling! YES!
dangermousie: (Song Hye-Kyo by miss-dian)
Reason 1675 why I love Mr. Mousie:

We are having dinner in a Vietnamese restaurant and I am complaining about the fact that I haven't haircut in entirely too long and as proof, I pull my bangs until they end up all the way down to the tip of my nose. He laughs and the following conversation ensues:

Cut for extreme geekiness )

We hit Barnes & Noble afterwards and I was most amused:

1. I found (and yes, bought) a novel which managed to turn Joan, 'Fair Maid of Kent' (mother of Richard II, wife of the Black Prince. If you are not into history, you are most likely to remember him as the character played by James Purefoy in A Knight's Tale) into a romantic heroine. I totally got it. It's not often you come across Edward the Black Prince novels :D

2. There was a book hideously entitled 'Stand Up history of French Revolution." Apparently standing up involved comparing Camille Desmoulins to Richard Federer and imagining what would happen if Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie led the revolution in America (whaaaaaa?)

3. There was a book entitled "The Physics of Buffyverse" which made me full of glee.

4. [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer, you'll be happy to know, I almost got Punch!. It looked awesome. I'll definitely get it later.

5. I found a manga volume of Tramps Like Us, which is the manga that was turned into Kimi Wa Petto jdrama. Amusingly, the guy even looked like MatsuJun. Speaking of that, should I watch the drama? I confess the concept really freaks me out (says the girl who is eagerly looking towards MatsuJun acting out twincest). Human pets? Twincest I can deal with. Power imbalance like that in a relationship is a bit too dom/sub for me. Is it good? Is it too freaky? Should I watch it? I am veeeeery tempted.

6. I got the sequel to Twilight. YES.

And last but not least! Hanadan is dling! YES!
dangermousie: (Default)
In the latest Veronica Mars fic round-up, I have three fics to recommend: Shuffle (Greatest Hits of 1966), an excellent and unusual post 2.22 story (if you are interested in ships, it's L/V), and The thing about Logan, a wondeful L/V fic that makes me so happy. There is also Bad Boys Break Fast, which is a delightful take on Logan cooking breakfast in 2.22.

Oh, and this morning? Chosen short shot of angst to get me going for the day? An ep from Season 1 of One Tree Hill, the horrid cheesefest that I can't help but be addicted to. CMM annoys the heck out of me, and I think Peyton and Brooke should be tied together and thrown off a boat, but I love me some Nathan/Haley (see Previous picspam and post on them). The show itself might be an evening version of daytime soap (OTH does not even try to transcend the teen genre or stand out the way Buffy or VM or Roswell), but the Nathan/Haley thing is what keeps me watching: they do have genuine chemistry and are awfully sweet together (I haven't seen most of S2, apparently the ship gets really messed with. Netflix is to the rescue, so we shall see). It starts out as a general cliche of a jerky rich jock and a grounded Miss Study but becomes a lot more fun (though no less cliche) as Nathan recieves enough angst for a small elephant and the whole thing is adorable. So I watched the bit where he comes into her roof after almost keeling over and tells her how much she means to him blah blah. Cheese, I love you.

I am reading Tanith Lee's The Gods are Thirsty, a novel about Camille Desmoulins and it's excellent. It has this unique, poetic writing style I love. She switches narrative persons with each chapter yet somehow it works. This has nothing in common with The Silver Metal Lover, the other book of hers I read except for the style. I think I am going to read much much more of her, now. [livejournal.com profile] aliterati, not much on Robespierre so far (Camille does mention something about following him to Hell. I think he means moral Hell as otherwise his chornology doesn't work), but you'd love the bit where he mentioned that Robespierre loved roses, and so Saint-Just used to bring them to him by the armful, "like a young bride."

Because it should be recced, [livejournal.com profile] mimesh, did a humongous Hayden Christensen picspam. Go here.

And I've finished Creezy. It's not bad but it's flawed. Creezy thoughts )

Next movie on the list to watch is Musa: The Warrior, a Korean period action film. I am not sure what it's about but it looks beautiful and stars Zhang Ziyi.

A multitude of Musa pics )

And more Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna stills came out KANK goodness behind cut )

ETA: More KANK pics KANK yourself out )
dangermousie: (Default)
In the latest Veronica Mars fic round-up, I have three fics to recommend: Shuffle (Greatest Hits of 1966), an excellent and unusual post 2.22 story (if you are interested in ships, it's L/V), and The thing about Logan, a wondeful L/V fic that makes me so happy. There is also Bad Boys Break Fast, which is a delightful take on Logan cooking breakfast in 2.22.

Oh, and this morning? Chosen short shot of angst to get me going for the day? An ep from Season 1 of One Tree Hill, the horrid cheesefest that I can't help but be addicted to. CMM annoys the heck out of me, and I think Peyton and Brooke should be tied together and thrown off a boat, but I love me some Nathan/Haley (see Previous picspam and post on them). The show itself might be an evening version of daytime soap (OTH does not even try to transcend the teen genre or stand out the way Buffy or VM or Roswell), but the Nathan/Haley thing is what keeps me watching: they do have genuine chemistry and are awfully sweet together (I haven't seen most of S2, apparently the ship gets really messed with. Netflix is to the rescue, so we shall see). It starts out as a general cliche of a jerky rich jock and a grounded Miss Study but becomes a lot more fun (though no less cliche) as Nathan recieves enough angst for a small elephant and the whole thing is adorable. So I watched the bit where he comes into her roof after almost keeling over and tells her how much she means to him blah blah. Cheese, I love you.

I am reading Tanith Lee's The Gods are Thirsty, a novel about Camille Desmoulins and it's excellent. It has this unique, poetic writing style I love. She switches narrative persons with each chapter yet somehow it works. This has nothing in common with The Silver Metal Lover, the other book of hers I read except for the style. I think I am going to read much much more of her, now. [livejournal.com profile] aliterati, not much on Robespierre so far (Camille does mention something about following him to Hell. I think he means moral Hell as otherwise his chornology doesn't work), but you'd love the bit where he mentioned that Robespierre loved roses, and so Saint-Just used to bring them to him by the armful, "like a young bride."

Because it should be recced, [livejournal.com profile] mimesh, did a humongous Hayden Christensen picspam. Go here.

And I've finished Creezy. It's not bad but it's flawed. Creezy thoughts )

Next movie on the list to watch is Musa: The Warrior, a Korean period action film. I am not sure what it's about but it looks beautiful and stars Zhang Ziyi.

A multitude of Musa pics )

And more Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna stills came out KANK goodness behind cut )

ETA: More KANK pics KANK yourself out )
dangermousie: (Default)
In the latest Veronica Mars fic round-up, I have three fics to recommend: Shuffle (Greatest Hits of 1966), an excellent and unusual post 2.22 story (if you are interested in ships, it's L/V), and The thing about Logan, a wondeful L/V fic that makes me so happy. There is also Bad Boys Break Fast, which is a delightful take on Logan cooking breakfast in 2.22.

Oh, and this morning? Chosen short shot of angst to get me going for the day? An ep from Season 1 of One Tree Hill, the horrid cheesefest that I can't help but be addicted to. CMM annoys the heck out of me, and I think Peyton and Brooke should be tied together and thrown off a boat, but I love me some Nathan/Haley (see Previous picspam and post on them). The show itself might be an evening version of daytime soap (OTH does not even try to transcend the teen genre or stand out the way Buffy or VM or Roswell), but the Nathan/Haley thing is what keeps me watching: they do have genuine chemistry and are awfully sweet together (I haven't seen most of S2, apparently the ship gets really messed with. Netflix is to the rescue, so we shall see). It starts out as a general cliche of a jerky rich jock and a grounded Miss Study but becomes a lot more fun (though no less cliche) as Nathan recieves enough angst for a small elephant and the whole thing is adorable. So I watched the bit where he comes into her roof after almost keeling over and tells her how much she means to him blah blah. Cheese, I love you.

I am reading Tanith Lee's The Gods are Thirsty, a novel about Camille Desmoulins and it's excellent. It has this unique, poetic writing style I love. She switches narrative persons with each chapter yet somehow it works. This has nothing in common with The Silver Metal Lover, the other book of hers I read except for the style. I think I am going to read much much more of her, now. [livejournal.com profile] aliterati, not much on Robespierre so far (Camille does mention something about following him to Hell. I think he means moral Hell as otherwise his chornology doesn't work), but you'd love the bit where he mentioned that Robespierre loved roses, and so Saint-Just used to bring them to him by the armful, "like a young bride."

Because it should be recced, [livejournal.com profile] mimesh, did a humongous Hayden Christensen picspam. Go here.

And I've finished Creezy. It's not bad but it's flawed. Creezy thoughts )

Next movie on the list to watch is Musa: The Warrior, a Korean period action film. I am not sure what it's about but it looks beautiful and stars Zhang Ziyi.

A multitude of Musa pics )

And more Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna stills came out KANK goodness behind cut )

ETA: More KANK pics KANK yourself out )
dangermousie: (LoVe: 1.15 by whereabout)
And here comes my latest in the series of posts of no interest to anyone except [livejournal.com profile] aliterati

Combining French Revolution and tackiness in staggering fashion, I present to you revolutionary figures with magnetic hair. Yes indeed. Have you always wondered what Robespierre would look like bald? or Danton with a handlebar mustache? Now you can find out, courtesy of Ebay.

Robespierre

Danton

Mirabeau

Saint-Just

Marat

Camille Desmoulins

Lucile Desmoulins

In case you are interested in what they really looked like, Portraits behind the cut )

And because I am on the French revolution kick, here is a portrait of Andre Chenier. Andre Chenier was a poet, executed during the Reign of Terror (here is an Encyclopedia Britannica article on him) I do love his widely quoted statement: "What is virtue? Reason put into practice. Talent? Reason expressed with brilliance. Soul? Reason delicately put forth. And genius is sublime reason."

Here are his poems in French. I don't read French well at all, so here are translations into Russian Charlotte Corday, Young Captive (it's the third poem on the list). Interestingly, both Pushkin and Tsvetayeva, very major Russian poets were very taken with Chenier, I think probably as an idea of the poet-revolutionary. They wrote poems about him, Pushkin's poem and Tsvetayava's poem are on line. They are, of course, in Russian. I am sure there are English translations of those as well as of Chenier's own poems, but I couldn't find those on-line. There has also been an opera about the guy.

Andre Chenier portrait )

Just for [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer Lavoisier Portrait )

Oh heck, a lot of protraits of other French revolutionaries and not-so-revolutionaries )
dangermousie: (LoVe: 1.15 by whereabout)
And here comes my latest in the series of posts of no interest to anyone except [livejournal.com profile] aliterati

Combining French Revolution and tackiness in staggering fashion, I present to you revolutionary figures with magnetic hair. Yes indeed. Have you always wondered what Robespierre would look like bald? or Danton with a handlebar mustache? Now you can find out, courtesy of Ebay.

Robespierre

Danton

Mirabeau

Saint-Just

Marat

Camille Desmoulins

Lucile Desmoulins

In case you are interested in what they really looked like, Portraits behind the cut )

And because I am on the French revolution kick, here is a portrait of Andre Chenier. Andre Chenier was a poet, executed during the Reign of Terror (here is an Encyclopedia Britannica article on him) I do love his widely quoted statement: "What is virtue? Reason put into practice. Talent? Reason expressed with brilliance. Soul? Reason delicately put forth. And genius is sublime reason."

Here are his poems in French. I don't read French well at all, so here are translations into Russian Charlotte Corday, Young Captive (it's the third poem on the list). Interestingly, both Pushkin and Tsvetayeva, very major Russian poets were very taken with Chenier, I think probably as an idea of the poet-revolutionary. They wrote poems about him, Pushkin's poem and Tsvetayava's poem are on line. They are, of course, in Russian. I am sure there are English translations of those as well as of Chenier's own poems, but I couldn't find those on-line. There has also been an opera about the guy.

Andre Chenier portrait )

Just for [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer Lavoisier Portrait )

Oh heck, a lot of protraits of other French revolutionaries and not-so-revolutionaries )
dangermousie: (LoVe: 1.15 by whereabout)
And here comes my latest in the series of posts of no interest to anyone except [livejournal.com profile] aliterati

Combining French Revolution and tackiness in staggering fashion, I present to you revolutionary figures with magnetic hair. Yes indeed. Have you always wondered what Robespierre would look like bald? or Danton with a handlebar mustache? Now you can find out, courtesy of Ebay.

Robespierre

Danton

Mirabeau

Saint-Just

Marat

Camille Desmoulins

Lucile Desmoulins

In case you are interested in what they really looked like, Portraits behind the cut )

And because I am on the French revolution kick, here is a portrait of Andre Chenier. Andre Chenier was a poet, executed during the Reign of Terror (here is an Encyclopedia Britannica article on him) I do love his widely quoted statement: "What is virtue? Reason put into practice. Talent? Reason expressed with brilliance. Soul? Reason delicately put forth. And genius is sublime reason."

Here are his poems in French. I don't read French well at all, so here are translations into Russian Charlotte Corday, Young Captive (it's the third poem on the list). Interestingly, both Pushkin and Tsvetayeva, very major Russian poets were very taken with Chenier, I think probably as an idea of the poet-revolutionary. They wrote poems about him, Pushkin's poem and Tsvetayava's poem are on line. They are, of course, in Russian. I am sure there are English translations of those as well as of Chenier's own poems, but I couldn't find those on-line. There has also been an opera about the guy.

Andre Chenier portrait )

Just for [livejournal.com profile] crumpeteer Lavoisier Portrait )

Oh heck, a lot of protraits of other French revolutionaries and not-so-revolutionaries )
dangermousie: (BW: Lagaan Gauri by chalkare)
Because I mentioned Camille Desmoulins in a previous post, in the context of Carlyle siting a letter of his to his wife, I've actually found the translated text on-line. It makes for a fascinating reading, mix of very personal and very political, romantic and (since I hesitate to call a man who is going to be exectuted whiny because...good cause for complaint) self-pitying.

Also, interestingly enough, people apparently OTP them: http://www.angelfire.com/ca6/frenchrevolution89/desmoulins.html

Well, they certainly had plenty of drama: Apparently Camille collapsed when he heard that Lucile, who stood outside the prison everyday so that he could see her, was to be arrested on trumped-up charges of leading a prison revolt. "They're going to kill my wife!" (they did, btw). And on the scaffold he gave a lock of Lucile's hair, which he had kept in a locket around his neck to the executioner asking him to give it to Lucile's mother. No wonder the Victorians ate it all up with a spoon. This is so totally Bollywood!

goodbye life, my soul, my share of divinity on earth )

OMG, there is actually a movie about them, a French TV drama with a rather unwieldy title of: Les Amours sous la révolution: La passion de Camille et Lucile Desmoulins. Maybe I could get my hands on it and then [livejournal.com profile] aliterati could bring her Saint-Just one (that I just found out was the one I saw when I was a kid and ended up drooling over Saint-Just, heeee), and we could make a night of really obscure movies about secondary French revolutionary figures. Heeeee.
dangermousie: (BW: Lagaan Gauri by chalkare)
Because I mentioned Camille Desmoulins in a previous post, in the context of Carlyle siting a letter of his to his wife, I've actually found the translated text on-line. It makes for a fascinating reading, mix of very personal and very political, romantic and (since I hesitate to call a man who is going to be exectuted whiny because...good cause for complaint) self-pitying.

Also, interestingly enough, people apparently OTP them: http://www.angelfire.com/ca6/frenchrevolution89/desmoulins.html

Well, they certainly had plenty of drama: Apparently Camille collapsed when he heard that Lucile, who stood outside the prison everyday so that he could see her, was to be arrested on trumped-up charges of leading a prison revolt. "They're going to kill my wife!" (they did, btw). And on the scaffold he gave a lock of Lucile's hair, which he had kept in a locket around his neck to the executioner asking him to give it to Lucile's mother. No wonder the Victorians ate it all up with a spoon. This is so totally Bollywood!

goodbye life, my soul, my share of divinity on earth )

OMG, there is actually a movie about them, a French TV drama with a rather unwieldy title of: Les Amours sous la révolution: La passion de Camille et Lucile Desmoulins. Maybe I could get my hands on it and then [livejournal.com profile] aliterati could bring her Saint-Just one (that I just found out was the one I saw when I was a kid and ended up drooling over Saint-Just, heeee), and we could make a night of really obscure movies about secondary French revolutionary figures. Heeeee.
dangermousie: (BW: Lagaan Gauri by chalkare)
Because I mentioned Camille Desmoulins in a previous post, in the context of Carlyle siting a letter of his to his wife, I've actually found the translated text on-line. It makes for a fascinating reading, mix of very personal and very political, romantic and (since I hesitate to call a man who is going to be exectuted whiny because...good cause for complaint) self-pitying.

Also, interestingly enough, people apparently OTP them: http://www.angelfire.com/ca6/frenchrevolution89/desmoulins.html

Well, they certainly had plenty of drama: Apparently Camille collapsed when he heard that Lucile, who stood outside the prison everyday so that he could see her, was to be arrested on trumped-up charges of leading a prison revolt. "They're going to kill my wife!" (they did, btw). And on the scaffold he gave a lock of Lucile's hair, which he had kept in a locket around his neck to the executioner asking him to give it to Lucile's mother. No wonder the Victorians ate it all up with a spoon. This is so totally Bollywood!

goodbye life, my soul, my share of divinity on earth )

OMG, there is actually a movie about them, a French TV drama with a rather unwieldy title of: Les Amours sous la révolution: La passion de Camille et Lucile Desmoulins. Maybe I could get my hands on it and then [livejournal.com profile] aliterati could bring her Saint-Just one (that I just found out was the one I saw when I was a kid and ended up drooling over Saint-Just, heeee), and we could make a night of really obscure movies about secondary French revolutionary figures. Heeeee.
dangermousie: (BW: Lagaan Aamir by chalkare)
OK, this is actually about all the people who hated Fanaa because it was unrealistic. You know, Fanaa. The movie whose one-line summary is "A blind girl and a terrorist fall in love." And it's a summary known basically to everyone who went to see it. This is not going to be a slice of real life, kitchen-sink drama, and you know exactly in advance what it's going to be. That's right, an epic, angstorrific melodrama, like so many other Bollywood movies. You've been warned. This is the genre it's in. It's like going to see MI3 and complaining there is too much action or some slasher flick and complaining about the violence. You can complain if the romance or the action or the horror is badly done, but you have to look at the movie within the confines of its genre.

Fanaa and genre )

In other, completely unrelated news, I've been reading the essay [livejournal.com profile] aliterati recommended on Robespierre by Hilary Mantel. I think I have a bit of a girl-crush on her now. That site has a lot of thoughtful essays and they are not all about the French Revolution either. There is a fascinating one about saintly fasts in the context of anorexia. Btw, Hilary Mantel is a novelist who wrote the best novel about the French Revolution I've read, called A Place of greater Safety which is the interconnecting stories of Danton, Robespierre and Camille Desmoulins (if the book has a main character, it's him). According to [livejournal.com profile] aliterati, she started the book in love with Camille and ended it in love with Robespierre but it was too late to re-write. I am not complaining since there are plenty of books about Robespierre and Danton and not that many about Camille.

And to go on a tangent, I remember reading Carlyle's The French Revolution and thinking how differently the historians used to write. Because I mentioned Camille, here is how Carlyle introduces him:

A fellow of infinite shrewdness, wit, nay humour; one of the sprightliest clearest souls in all these millions. Thou poor Camille, say of thee what they may, it were but falsehood to pretend one did not almost love thee, thou headlong lightly-sparkling man!

Or this description of Robespierre (whom he clearly wasn't fond of, sorry [livejournal.com profile] aliterati): With a strict painful mind, an understanding small but clear and ready, he grew in favour with official persons, who could foresee in him an excellent man of business, happily quite free from genius. Ouch.

Or on Danton: The great heart of Danton is weary of it. Danton is gone to native Arcis, for a little breathing time of peace: Away, black Arachne-webs, thou world of Fury, Terror, and Suspicion; welcome, thou everlasting Mother, with thy spring greenness, thy kind household loves and memories; true art thou, were all else untrue! The great Titan walks silent, by the banks of the murmuring Aube, in young native haunts that knew him when a boy; wonders what the end of these things may be.

Can you imagine a modern historian writing so? But I actually rather like it. It makes for a hell of an entertaining read, if nothing else.

And of course, the Georgians were struck by the 'romantic,' just the way we are. Just see this: Camille's young beautiful Wife, who had made him rich not in money alone, hovers round the Luxembourg, like a disembodied spirit, day and night. Camille's stolen letters to her still exist; stained with the mark of his tears. (Apercus sur Camille Desmoulins in Vieux Cordelier, Paris, 1825, pp. 1-29.) The citation at the end is rather anticlimactic :) (I did read some of them, as well as his other stuff, and he was quite a good writer. Understandably angsty and self-pitying in the letters to Lucile that Carlyle mentions though).

Of course, whatever Carlyle's historical biases, he was an immensely readable writer.

And thus ends this digression from anything...
dangermousie: (BW: Lagaan Aamir by chalkare)
OK, this is actually about all the people who hated Fanaa because it was unrealistic. You know, Fanaa. The movie whose one-line summary is "A blind girl and a terrorist fall in love." And it's a summary known basically to everyone who went to see it. This is not going to be a slice of real life, kitchen-sink drama, and you know exactly in advance what it's going to be. That's right, an epic, angstorrific melodrama, like so many other Bollywood movies. You've been warned. This is the genre it's in. It's like going to see MI3 and complaining there is too much action or some slasher flick and complaining about the violence. You can complain if the romance or the action or the horror is badly done, but you have to look at the movie within the confines of its genre.

Fanaa and genre )

In other, completely unrelated news, I've been reading the essay [livejournal.com profile] aliterati recommended on Robespierre by Hilary Mantel. I think I have a bit of a girl-crush on her now. That site has a lot of thoughtful essays and they are not all about the French Revolution either. There is a fascinating one about saintly fasts in the context of anorexia. Btw, Hilary Mantel is a novelist who wrote the best novel about the French Revolution I've read, called A Place of greater Safety which is the interconnecting stories of Danton, Robespierre and Camille Desmoulins (if the book has a main character, it's him). According to [livejournal.com profile] aliterati, she started the book in love with Camille and ended it in love with Robespierre but it was too late to re-write. I am not complaining since there are plenty of books about Robespierre and Danton and not that many about Camille.

And to go on a tangent, I remember reading Carlyle's The French Revolution and thinking how differently the historians used to write. Because I mentioned Camille, here is how Carlyle introduces him:

A fellow of infinite shrewdness, wit, nay humour; one of the sprightliest clearest souls in all these millions. Thou poor Camille, say of thee what they may, it were but falsehood to pretend one did not almost love thee, thou headlong lightly-sparkling man!

Or this description of Robespierre (whom he clearly wasn't fond of, sorry [livejournal.com profile] aliterati): With a strict painful mind, an understanding small but clear and ready, he grew in favour with official persons, who could foresee in him an excellent man of business, happily quite free from genius. Ouch.

Or on Danton: The great heart of Danton is weary of it. Danton is gone to native Arcis, for a little breathing time of peace: Away, black Arachne-webs, thou world of Fury, Terror, and Suspicion; welcome, thou everlasting Mother, with thy spring greenness, thy kind household loves and memories; true art thou, were all else untrue! The great Titan walks silent, by the banks of the murmuring Aube, in young native haunts that knew him when a boy; wonders what the end of these things may be.

Can you imagine a modern historian writing so? But I actually rather like it. It makes for a hell of an entertaining read, if nothing else.

And of course, the Georgians were struck by the 'romantic,' just the way we are. Just see this: Camille's young beautiful Wife, who had made him rich not in money alone, hovers round the Luxembourg, like a disembodied spirit, day and night. Camille's stolen letters to her still exist; stained with the mark of his tears. (Apercus sur Camille Desmoulins in Vieux Cordelier, Paris, 1825, pp. 1-29.) The citation at the end is rather anticlimactic :) (I did read some of them, as well as his other stuff, and he was quite a good writer. Understandably angsty and self-pitying in the letters to Lucile that Carlyle mentions though).

Of course, whatever Carlyle's historical biases, he was an immensely readable writer.

And thus ends this digression from anything...
dangermousie: (BW: Lagaan Aamir by chalkare)
OK, this is actually about all the people who hated Fanaa because it was unrealistic. You know, Fanaa. The movie whose one-line summary is "A blind girl and a terrorist fall in love." And it's a summary known basically to everyone who went to see it. This is not going to be a slice of real life, kitchen-sink drama, and you know exactly in advance what it's going to be. That's right, an epic, angstorrific melodrama, like so many other Bollywood movies. You've been warned. This is the genre it's in. It's like going to see MI3 and complaining there is too much action or some slasher flick and complaining about the violence. You can complain if the romance or the action or the horror is badly done, but you have to look at the movie within the confines of its genre.

Fanaa and genre )

In other, completely unrelated news, I've been reading the essay [livejournal.com profile] aliterati recommended on Robespierre by Hilary Mantel. I think I have a bit of a girl-crush on her now. That site has a lot of thoughtful essays and they are not all about the French Revolution either. There is a fascinating one about saintly fasts in the context of anorexia. Btw, Hilary Mantel is a novelist who wrote the best novel about the French Revolution I've read, called A Place of greater Safety which is the interconnecting stories of Danton, Robespierre and Camille Desmoulins (if the book has a main character, it's him). According to [livejournal.com profile] aliterati, she started the book in love with Camille and ended it in love with Robespierre but it was too late to re-write. I am not complaining since there are plenty of books about Robespierre and Danton and not that many about Camille.

And to go on a tangent, I remember reading Carlyle's The French Revolution and thinking how differently the historians used to write. Because I mentioned Camille, here is how Carlyle introduces him:

A fellow of infinite shrewdness, wit, nay humour; one of the sprightliest clearest souls in all these millions. Thou poor Camille, say of thee what they may, it were but falsehood to pretend one did not almost love thee, thou headlong lightly-sparkling man!

Or this description of Robespierre (whom he clearly wasn't fond of, sorry [livejournal.com profile] aliterati): With a strict painful mind, an understanding small but clear and ready, he grew in favour with official persons, who could foresee in him an excellent man of business, happily quite free from genius. Ouch.

Or on Danton: The great heart of Danton is weary of it. Danton is gone to native Arcis, for a little breathing time of peace: Away, black Arachne-webs, thou world of Fury, Terror, and Suspicion; welcome, thou everlasting Mother, with thy spring greenness, thy kind household loves and memories; true art thou, were all else untrue! The great Titan walks silent, by the banks of the murmuring Aube, in young native haunts that knew him when a boy; wonders what the end of these things may be.

Can you imagine a modern historian writing so? But I actually rather like it. It makes for a hell of an entertaining read, if nothing else.

And of course, the Georgians were struck by the 'romantic,' just the way we are. Just see this: Camille's young beautiful Wife, who had made him rich not in money alone, hovers round the Luxembourg, like a disembodied spirit, day and night. Camille's stolen letters to her still exist; stained with the mark of his tears. (Apercus sur Camille Desmoulins in Vieux Cordelier, Paris, 1825, pp. 1-29.) The citation at the end is rather anticlimactic :) (I did read some of them, as well as his other stuff, and he was quite a good writer. Understandably angsty and self-pitying in the letters to Lucile that Carlyle mentions though).

Of course, whatever Carlyle's historical biases, he was an immensely readable writer.

And thus ends this digression from anything...

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