dangermousie: (N&S: Thornton/Margaret kiss by alexandra)
As mentioned previously, I am on a Lymond kick (btw, Lymond are the only books I read with a dictionary. Narwhal? Palimpcest? Thank you Dunnett). And being on this kick made me think about Dorothy Sayers and Lord Peter, probably because Lymond and Lymond Chronicles owe a lot to Sayers and her detective.

Actually, walking this morning, it just occurred to me how much Lymond is inspired by Lord Peter (though of course he is uniquely his own, as a character), and I don't just refer to the aristocratic blondness. They are both emotionally high-strung (the old term would have been 'nervy'), extremely self-controlled men. Both with an amazing intellect and strength of purpose they conceal under a manner to guard themselves (Lymond is all about politics, Lord Peter does diplomatic missions in between his sleuthing). They are polyglot quotation magpies, with a love of poetry (I bet if John Donne existed when Lymond lived, he would be quoting him non-stop) and a passion for music.

Both were promising but rather well-adjusted-into-society young men with a set path in front of them (Lord Peter had double firsts in Oxford and was going to be a historian and Lymond was a child genius of Sorbonne who was going to be a conventional if bright young nobleman involved in politics). And then both got horribly derailed and traumatized by an event that happened prior to anything in the books but has shaped them completely: for Lord Peter is was WWI and his shell-shock (we only learn just how bad it was in "Busman's Honeymoon"), and for Lymond it was Solway Moss and the whole Lennox/Eloise/Galleys thing. And this past continues to affect them. And for both, their chosen fields of endeavor, while uniquely suited for them, actually continue to mess them up further and feed into their issues and feelings of 'unworthiness' (Lord Peter realizes that as a result of his sleuthing people get caught and executed. Just witness his falling apart in front of Harriet. And everything Lymond does and that is done to him in the course of the books violates his headspace and his soul more and more). Both men are all about control, not just because they'd had so little earlier, but also because without control they would sit in a little room, screaming.

The authors are marvelous about showing us so much through so little. Letting us figure things out. We rarely get directly into Peter's head (Harriet, like Philippa and Jerott in later books can come closest to what the heroes are really about, but it's still indirect), and we only see twice inside Lymond's head, but somehow, through all the indirections and mirrors and shields, we get to know the characters intimately. It's in what they don't say. Even though the chess game in Pawn in unbearable ("I've been good" makes me shudder), there is no scene that freaks me out more than Lymond first coming across the child Khaireddin, who is his son. And Khaireddin is small, and painted, and has been a child prostitute. And the whole scene is horrifying, with Khaireddin offering favors to his own father who he doesn't know is that, and the scene would make anyone sick and yet Lymond reacts with amazing rightness and gentleness and treats Khaireddin like a real little boy/man and subnegates himself in doing what's right for him, no matter what it costs him. Even though anyone decent would have a strong reaction to child prostitution. And more than that, Khaireddin is his son. And not just that, if anyone has buttons about sexual abuse, Lymond would (a beautiful 16 year old on the galleys? He was pretty surely toast). Checkmate spoiler ) But the control and care Lymond has is all not about him. And Dunnett wants us to infer all that, there is no beating over the head with it.

Even the families are a bit similar: both have brilliant mothers they adore, and shadowy fathers. And a well-meaning, dull elder brother, who loves but doesn't understand.

And then there are the women they love. Both of them are grounded by the somewhat younger, much more pragmatic, yet fiercely wounded women they fall in love with. And those women make them jump through hoops (not on purpose) but really are what saves them. Checkmate spoiler )

And of course, both those women are fiercely intelligent, yet wounded and need healing in turn, and are in some ways mirroring their men. For Harriet it's her trial for murder and her shabby lover who made her betray all her traditonal belief for principles it turns out he didn't mean (and what a parallel with Lord Peter and his earlier love of someone unworthy. That girl before WWI). And the same is true for Philippa. Spoiler for Checkmate )

So yeah, there is a great deal of reason for why I love both.

And to finish on a Lymondish note, here is a quote about James Cobham from Freedom and Necessity. Rather Lymondish/Lord Peterish, don't you think?

That person was a collection of fragments held into man-shape by an outher shell that, depending on the moment, might be unmarked and brittle as glass or itself in a state of suspended collapse.

Or this:

At about three o'clock he appeared in the parlour, neat as the proverbial pin, flawlessly composed-in other words, nearly indistinguishable from a well-embalmed corpse except that he was mobile, upright, and articulate.

No wonder I love the book.

And for those who are 'what crack are you on and what are you blabbing about,' I present a bit of Hayden picspam. A lot of Hayden picspam actually.



Talking about the pretty. Feast your eyes on this )
dangermousie: (N&S: Thornton/Margaret kiss by alexandra)
As mentioned previously, I am on a Lymond kick (btw, Lymond are the only books I read with a dictionary. Narwhal? Palimpcest? Thank you Dunnett). And being on this kick made me think about Dorothy Sayers and Lord Peter, probably because Lymond and Lymond Chronicles owe a lot to Sayers and her detective.

Actually, walking this morning, it just occurred to me how much Lymond is inspired by Lord Peter (though of course he is uniquely his own, as a character), and I don't just refer to the aristocratic blondness. They are both emotionally high-strung (the old term would have been 'nervy'), extremely self-controlled men. Both with an amazing intellect and strength of purpose they conceal under a manner to guard themselves (Lymond is all about politics, Lord Peter does diplomatic missions in between his sleuthing). They are polyglot quotation magpies, with a love of poetry (I bet if John Donne existed when Lymond lived, he would be quoting him non-stop) and a passion for music.

Both were promising but rather well-adjusted-into-society young men with a set path in front of them (Lord Peter had double firsts in Oxford and was going to be a historian and Lymond was a child genius of Sorbonne who was going to be a conventional if bright young nobleman involved in politics). And then both got horribly derailed and traumatized by an event that happened prior to anything in the books but has shaped them completely: for Lord Peter is was WWI and his shell-shock (we only learn just how bad it was in "Busman's Honeymoon"), and for Lymond it was Solway Moss and the whole Lennox/Eloise/Galleys thing. And this past continues to affect them. And for both, their chosen fields of endeavor, while uniquely suited for them, actually continue to mess them up further and feed into their issues and feelings of 'unworthiness' (Lord Peter realizes that as a result of his sleuthing people get caught and executed. Just witness his falling apart in front of Harriet. And everything Lymond does and that is done to him in the course of the books violates his headspace and his soul more and more). Both men are all about control, not just because they'd had so little earlier, but also because without control they would sit in a little room, screaming.

The authors are marvelous about showing us so much through so little. Letting us figure things out. We rarely get directly into Peter's head (Harriet, like Philippa and Jerott in later books can come closest to what the heroes are really about, but it's still indirect), and we only see twice inside Lymond's head, but somehow, through all the indirections and mirrors and shields, we get to know the characters intimately. It's in what they don't say. Even though the chess game in Pawn in unbearable ("I've been good" makes me shudder), there is no scene that freaks me out more than Lymond first coming across the child Khaireddin, who is his son. And Khaireddin is small, and painted, and has been a child prostitute. And the whole scene is horrifying, with Khaireddin offering favors to his own father who he doesn't know is that, and the scene would make anyone sick and yet Lymond reacts with amazing rightness and gentleness and treats Khaireddin like a real little boy/man and subnegates himself in doing what's right for him, no matter what it costs him. Even though anyone decent would have a strong reaction to child prostitution. And more than that, Khaireddin is his son. And not just that, if anyone has buttons about sexual abuse, Lymond would (a beautiful 16 year old on the galleys? He was pretty surely toast). Checkmate spoiler ) But the control and care Lymond has is all not about him. And Dunnett wants us to infer all that, there is no beating over the head with it.

Even the families are a bit similar: both have brilliant mothers they adore, and shadowy fathers. And a well-meaning, dull elder brother, who loves but doesn't understand.

And then there are the women they love. Both of them are grounded by the somewhat younger, much more pragmatic, yet fiercely wounded women they fall in love with. And those women make them jump through hoops (not on purpose) but really are what saves them. Checkmate spoiler )

And of course, both those women are fiercely intelligent, yet wounded and need healing in turn, and are in some ways mirroring their men. For Harriet it's her trial for murder and her shabby lover who made her betray all her traditonal belief for principles it turns out he didn't mean (and what a parallel with Lord Peter and his earlier love of someone unworthy. That girl before WWI). And the same is true for Philippa. Spoiler for Checkmate )

So yeah, there is a great deal of reason for why I love both.

And to finish on a Lymondish note, here is a quote about James Cobham from Freedom and Necessity. Rather Lymondish/Lord Peterish, don't you think?

That person was a collection of fragments held into man-shape by an outher shell that, depending on the moment, might be unmarked and brittle as glass or itself in a state of suspended collapse.

Or this:

At about three o'clock he appeared in the parlour, neat as the proverbial pin, flawlessly composed-in other words, nearly indistinguishable from a well-embalmed corpse except that he was mobile, upright, and articulate.

No wonder I love the book.

And for those who are 'what crack are you on and what are you blabbing about,' I present a bit of Hayden picspam. A lot of Hayden picspam actually.



Talking about the pretty. Feast your eyes on this )
dangermousie: (N&S: Thornton/Margaret kiss by alexandra)
As mentioned previously, I am on a Lymond kick (btw, Lymond are the only books I read with a dictionary. Narwhal? Palimpcest? Thank you Dunnett). And being on this kick made me think about Dorothy Sayers and Lord Peter, probably because Lymond and Lymond Chronicles owe a lot to Sayers and her detective.

Actually, walking this morning, it just occurred to me how much Lymond is inspired by Lord Peter (though of course he is uniquely his own, as a character), and I don't just refer to the aristocratic blondness. They are both emotionally high-strung (the old term would have been 'nervy'), extremely self-controlled men. Both with an amazing intellect and strength of purpose they conceal under a manner to guard themselves (Lymond is all about politics, Lord Peter does diplomatic missions in between his sleuthing). They are polyglot quotation magpies, with a love of poetry (I bet if John Donne existed when Lymond lived, he would be quoting him non-stop) and a passion for music.

Both were promising but rather well-adjusted-into-society young men with a set path in front of them (Lord Peter had double firsts in Oxford and was going to be a historian and Lymond was a child genius of Sorbonne who was going to be a conventional if bright young nobleman involved in politics). And then both got horribly derailed and traumatized by an event that happened prior to anything in the books but has shaped them completely: for Lord Peter is was WWI and his shell-shock (we only learn just how bad it was in "Busman's Honeymoon"), and for Lymond it was Solway Moss and the whole Lennox/Eloise/Galleys thing. And this past continues to affect them. And for both, their chosen fields of endeavor, while uniquely suited for them, actually continue to mess them up further and feed into their issues and feelings of 'unworthiness' (Lord Peter realizes that as a result of his sleuthing people get caught and executed. Just witness his falling apart in front of Harriet. And everything Lymond does and that is done to him in the course of the books violates his headspace and his soul more and more). Both men are all about control, not just because they'd had so little earlier, but also because without control they would sit in a little room, screaming.

The authors are marvelous about showing us so much through so little. Letting us figure things out. We rarely get directly into Peter's head (Harriet, like Philippa and Jerott in later books can come closest to what the heroes are really about, but it's still indirect), and we only see twice inside Lymond's head, but somehow, through all the indirections and mirrors and shields, we get to know the characters intimately. It's in what they don't say. Even though the chess game in Pawn in unbearable ("I've been good" makes me shudder), there is no scene that freaks me out more than Lymond first coming across the child Khaireddin, who is his son. And Khaireddin is small, and painted, and has been a child prostitute. And the whole scene is horrifying, with Khaireddin offering favors to his own father who he doesn't know is that, and the scene would make anyone sick and yet Lymond reacts with amazing rightness and gentleness and treats Khaireddin like a real little boy/man and subnegates himself in doing what's right for him, no matter what it costs him. Even though anyone decent would have a strong reaction to child prostitution. And more than that, Khaireddin is his son. And not just that, if anyone has buttons about sexual abuse, Lymond would (a beautiful 16 year old on the galleys? He was pretty surely toast). Checkmate spoiler ) But the control and care Lymond has is all not about him. And Dunnett wants us to infer all that, there is no beating over the head with it.

Even the families are a bit similar: both have brilliant mothers they adore, and shadowy fathers. And a well-meaning, dull elder brother, who loves but doesn't understand.

And then there are the women they love. Both of them are grounded by the somewhat younger, much more pragmatic, yet fiercely wounded women they fall in love with. And those women make them jump through hoops (not on purpose) but really are what saves them. Checkmate spoiler )

And of course, both those women are fiercely intelligent, yet wounded and need healing in turn, and are in some ways mirroring their men. For Harriet it's her trial for murder and her shabby lover who made her betray all her traditonal belief for principles it turns out he didn't mean (and what a parallel with Lord Peter and his earlier love of someone unworthy. That girl before WWI). And the same is true for Philippa. Spoiler for Checkmate )

So yeah, there is a great deal of reason for why I love both.

And to finish on a Lymondish note, here is a quote about James Cobham from Freedom and Necessity. Rather Lymondish/Lord Peterish, don't you think?

That person was a collection of fragments held into man-shape by an outher shell that, depending on the moment, might be unmarked and brittle as glass or itself in a state of suspended collapse.

Or this:

At about three o'clock he appeared in the parlour, neat as the proverbial pin, flawlessly composed-in other words, nearly indistinguishable from a well-embalmed corpse except that he was mobile, upright, and articulate.

No wonder I love the book.

And for those who are 'what crack are you on and what are you blabbing about,' I present a bit of Hayden picspam. A lot of Hayden picspam actually.



Talking about the pretty. Feast your eyes on this )
dangermousie: (Cyclops by anitabuchan)
I am reading Freedom and Necessity, by Steven Brust and Emma Bull. I love it. I know [livejournal.com profile] queenofthorns did not care much for it, but while it's not the best book ever written, it's very very enjoyable, sort of a modern take on a Willkie Collins novel. The novel (entirely epistolary) is set in 1849 and centers around James Cobham, a man-about-town who comes to himself in a country inn, with no idea how he got there and no memory of the past few months. Corresponding with his cousin Richard, he discovers he's been presumed drowned and they decide to investigate what's behind all this. James' other cousin Kitty and Kitty's best friend Susan (an extremely strong-minded young woman who has always been fascinated by James) are also on the trail. What they find out is that James is wanted by everyone: by government conspirators, by the Chartists (a social movement of mid-century) and by unscrupulous members of his own family. And as James slowly pieces the puzzle together, Susan and Kitty and Richard (and the reader) find out just how much of that carefully indolent pose was a mask, and in reality James becomes a Lymond-ish figure, messed-up, and brilliant and masked and fragile and with a huge social conscience mixed with hard-won cynisism.

The book started a bit slowly for my tastes, but it really picked up about a hundred pages in and is now unputdownable, mainly because I am rather in love with James (who granted, in no Lymond, but does have Lymondish qualities). The women aren't as well drawn, but I am all about the men anyhow. And of course, like with any novel in letters, a bit of suspension of disbelief about the characters' writing speed and memories for conversation has to be assumed.

In completely unrelated news, I've started watching Bluffmaster, a delightful Bolly flick. Roy (Abhishek Bachchan) is a master con-artist who is trying to go straight to win back his fiancee (Priyanka Chopra) but is forced to take on a dimwitted apprentice Ditty (Riteish). And the whole thing spirals out of control. It's a funny, clever, witty movie, the cast of characters is delightful, Abhi/Priyanka chemistry is out of this world, and Abhishek continues his recent run of great movies (it's an odd thing to say, but I think he comes across as most masculine of the new generation of Bolly stars. Not sure how to phrase it but...)

And now, the uber main point of this post. Hayden Christensen picspam. Yup. More Hayden than you can shake a stick at. But why would you want to? Some GORGEOUS pics behind the cut.



Hayden Goodness Behind Cut )
dangermousie: (Cyclops by anitabuchan)
I am reading Freedom and Necessity, by Steven Brust and Emma Bull. I love it. I know [livejournal.com profile] queenofthorns did not care much for it, but while it's not the best book ever written, it's very very enjoyable, sort of a modern take on a Willkie Collins novel. The novel (entirely epistolary) is set in 1849 and centers around James Cobham, a man-about-town who comes to himself in a country inn, with no idea how he got there and no memory of the past few months. Corresponding with his cousin Richard, he discovers he's been presumed drowned and they decide to investigate what's behind all this. James' other cousin Kitty and Kitty's best friend Susan (an extremely strong-minded young woman who has always been fascinated by James) are also on the trail. What they find out is that James is wanted by everyone: by government conspirators, by the Chartists (a social movement of mid-century) and by unscrupulous members of his own family. And as James slowly pieces the puzzle together, Susan and Kitty and Richard (and the reader) find out just how much of that carefully indolent pose was a mask, and in reality James becomes a Lymond-ish figure, messed-up, and brilliant and masked and fragile and with a huge social conscience mixed with hard-won cynisism.

The book started a bit slowly for my tastes, but it really picked up about a hundred pages in and is now unputdownable, mainly because I am rather in love with James (who granted, in no Lymond, but does have Lymondish qualities). The women aren't as well drawn, but I am all about the men anyhow. And of course, like with any novel in letters, a bit of suspension of disbelief about the characters' writing speed and memories for conversation has to be assumed.

In completely unrelated news, I've started watching Bluffmaster, a delightful Bolly flick. Roy (Abhishek Bachchan) is a master con-artist who is trying to go straight to win back his fiancee (Priyanka Chopra) but is forced to take on a dimwitted apprentice Ditty (Riteish). And the whole thing spirals out of control. It's a funny, clever, witty movie, the cast of characters is delightful, Abhi/Priyanka chemistry is out of this world, and Abhishek continues his recent run of great movies (it's an odd thing to say, but I think he comes across as most masculine of the new generation of Bolly stars. Not sure how to phrase it but...)

And now, the uber main point of this post. Hayden Christensen picspam. Yup. More Hayden than you can shake a stick at. But why would you want to? Some GORGEOUS pics behind the cut.



Hayden Goodness Behind Cut )
dangermousie: (Cyclops by anitabuchan)
I am reading Freedom and Necessity, by Steven Brust and Emma Bull. I love it. I know [livejournal.com profile] queenofthorns did not care much for it, but while it's not the best book ever written, it's very very enjoyable, sort of a modern take on a Willkie Collins novel. The novel (entirely epistolary) is set in 1849 and centers around James Cobham, a man-about-town who comes to himself in a country inn, with no idea how he got there and no memory of the past few months. Corresponding with his cousin Richard, he discovers he's been presumed drowned and they decide to investigate what's behind all this. James' other cousin Kitty and Kitty's best friend Susan (an extremely strong-minded young woman who has always been fascinated by James) are also on the trail. What they find out is that James is wanted by everyone: by government conspirators, by the Chartists (a social movement of mid-century) and by unscrupulous members of his own family. And as James slowly pieces the puzzle together, Susan and Kitty and Richard (and the reader) find out just how much of that carefully indolent pose was a mask, and in reality James becomes a Lymond-ish figure, messed-up, and brilliant and masked and fragile and with a huge social conscience mixed with hard-won cynisism.

The book started a bit slowly for my tastes, but it really picked up about a hundred pages in and is now unputdownable, mainly because I am rather in love with James (who granted, in no Lymond, but does have Lymondish qualities). The women aren't as well drawn, but I am all about the men anyhow. And of course, like with any novel in letters, a bit of suspension of disbelief about the characters' writing speed and memories for conversation has to be assumed.

In completely unrelated news, I've started watching Bluffmaster, a delightful Bolly flick. Roy (Abhishek Bachchan) is a master con-artist who is trying to go straight to win back his fiancee (Priyanka Chopra) but is forced to take on a dimwitted apprentice Ditty (Riteish). And the whole thing spirals out of control. It's a funny, clever, witty movie, the cast of characters is delightful, Abhi/Priyanka chemistry is out of this world, and Abhishek continues his recent run of great movies (it's an odd thing to say, but I think he comes across as most masculine of the new generation of Bolly stars. Not sure how to phrase it but...)

And now, the uber main point of this post. Hayden Christensen picspam. Yup. More Hayden than you can shake a stick at. But why would you want to? Some GORGEOUS pics behind the cut.



Hayden Goodness Behind Cut )

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