dangermousie: (Default)
On the trip, I ended up reading one of the most unusual, chilling, and somehow inspiring book: Excellent Cadavers by Alexander Stille.

I still feel like shaking when I think about it. It's a non-fiction account about the two Sicilian anti-mafia prosecutors, Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino, who revolutionized the fight against the mafia, who blew the lid off mafia prevalence and off the political connections of the mafia, and who were assassinated by the mob in the early 1990s.

This book has been haunting me: on one hand I am in awe of Falcone and Borsellino (and other brave prosecutors and policemen), who pursued this unbelievable investigation (their actions resulted in the maxi-trials of the 1980s) but they starkly stick out (and usually get murdered) in an environment of brutality, fear, and complete corruption of business and government. This book made me incredibly angry, as well.

Anyway, it's amazing. Go read it. I mean it.

Amazon describes it thus:

In Sicily, "excellent cadavers" are Mafia victims who also happen to be government officials. Excellent Cadavers is full of them, notably the courageous and tenacious prosecutors, Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino. Throughout the 1980s, Falcone and Borsellino brought down more heat on the "men of honor" than anyone since Mussolini's handpicked "Iron Prefect." The two not only sent hundreds of gangsters to jail, they also exposed Mafia corruption of national political leaders that led to the indictments of two of Italy's best-known politicians, Bettino Craxi and Guilio Adreotti. The success of their investigations brought on reprisals by corrupt politicians designed to weaken police and prosecutors alike and ultimately led to their deaths. Falcone and Borsellino were assassinated by bombs in 1992, but their work brought to light revelations that are rattling the current Berlusconi administration. Stille has crafted an excellent book, deftly weaving complex threads of information about Italian, Sicilian, and Mafia history, Italian politics, and Italian jurisprudence into a highly readable narrative.

There has apparently been a docudrama about them, with the same name.

When I was a kid, in early 1990s, they showed an Italian mini dubbed in Russian, called 'La Piovra' about an anti-mafia investigator. It was great fun to watch, but I remember thinking that surely the scope of killings was exaggerated: his friends and family was killed, and eventually he was killed as well. After that book, I think the mini might have been too kind.
dangermousie: (Default)
On the trip, I ended up reading one of the most unusual, chilling, and somehow inspiring book: Excellent Cadavers by Alexander Stille.

I still feel like shaking when I think about it. It's a non-fiction account about the two Sicilian anti-mafia prosecutors, Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino, who revolutionized the fight against the mafia, who blew the lid off mafia prevalence and off the political connections of the mafia, and who were assassinated by the mob in the early 1990s.

This book has been haunting me: on one hand I am in awe of Falcone and Borsellino (and other brave prosecutors and policemen), who pursued this unbelievable investigation (their actions resulted in the maxi-trials of the 1980s) but they starkly stick out (and usually get murdered) in an environment of brutality, fear, and complete corruption of business and government. This book made me incredibly angry, as well.

Anyway, it's amazing. Go read it. I mean it.

Amazon describes it thus:

In Sicily, "excellent cadavers" are Mafia victims who also happen to be government officials. Excellent Cadavers is full of them, notably the courageous and tenacious prosecutors, Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino. Throughout the 1980s, Falcone and Borsellino brought down more heat on the "men of honor" than anyone since Mussolini's handpicked "Iron Prefect." The two not only sent hundreds of gangsters to jail, they also exposed Mafia corruption of national political leaders that led to the indictments of two of Italy's best-known politicians, Bettino Craxi and Guilio Adreotti. The success of their investigations brought on reprisals by corrupt politicians designed to weaken police and prosecutors alike and ultimately led to their deaths. Falcone and Borsellino were assassinated by bombs in 1992, but their work brought to light revelations that are rattling the current Berlusconi administration. Stille has crafted an excellent book, deftly weaving complex threads of information about Italian, Sicilian, and Mafia history, Italian politics, and Italian jurisprudence into a highly readable narrative.

There has apparently been a docudrama about them, with the same name.

When I was a kid, in early 1990s, they showed an Italian mini dubbed in Russian, called 'La Piovra' about an anti-mafia investigator. It was great fun to watch, but I remember thinking that surely the scope of killings was exaggerated: his friends and family was killed, and eventually he was killed as well. After that book, I think the mini might have been too kind.
dangermousie: (Default)
On the trip, I ended up reading one of the most unusual, chilling, and somehow inspiring book: Excellent Cadavers by Alexander Stille.

I still feel like shaking when I think about it. It's a non-fiction account about the two Sicilian anti-mafia prosecutors, Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino, who revolutionized the fight against the mafia, who blew the lid off mafia prevalence and off the political connections of the mafia, and who were assassinated by the mob in the early 1990s.

This book has been haunting me: on one hand I am in awe of Falcone and Borsellino (and other brave prosecutors and policemen), who pursued this unbelievable investigation (their actions resulted in the maxi-trials of the 1980s) but they starkly stick out (and usually get murdered) in an environment of brutality, fear, and complete corruption of business and government. This book made me incredibly angry, as well.

Anyway, it's amazing. Go read it. I mean it.

Amazon describes it thus:

In Sicily, "excellent cadavers" are Mafia victims who also happen to be government officials. Excellent Cadavers is full of them, notably the courageous and tenacious prosecutors, Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino. Throughout the 1980s, Falcone and Borsellino brought down more heat on the "men of honor" than anyone since Mussolini's handpicked "Iron Prefect." The two not only sent hundreds of gangsters to jail, they also exposed Mafia corruption of national political leaders that led to the indictments of two of Italy's best-known politicians, Bettino Craxi and Guilio Adreotti. The success of their investigations brought on reprisals by corrupt politicians designed to weaken police and prosecutors alike and ultimately led to their deaths. Falcone and Borsellino were assassinated by bombs in 1992, but their work brought to light revelations that are rattling the current Berlusconi administration. Stille has crafted an excellent book, deftly weaving complex threads of information about Italian, Sicilian, and Mafia history, Italian politics, and Italian jurisprudence into a highly readable narrative.

There has apparently been a docudrama about them, with the same name.

When I was a kid, in early 1990s, they showed an Italian mini dubbed in Russian, called 'La Piovra' about an anti-mafia investigator. It was great fun to watch, but I remember thinking that surely the scope of killings was exaggerated: his friends and family was killed, and eventually he was killed as well. After that book, I think the mini might have been too kind.

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