dangermousie: (Capital Scandal Secrets by miss_dian)
Chances are, if you've found this LJ, you are here because you already know and like dramas, my main subject of posting. But in case not, here is a quick and dirty primer.

What Are Dramas



Dramas (or "doramas") are Asia's answer to scripted TV shows, i.e. it's a term for TV shows from that part of the world. We in the US have Ugly Betty, Gossip Girl or the E.R. They have Pride, Save the Last Dance, or Mars. This term does not apply to reality shows, variety shows, or sitcoms (even though those are scripted too), btw.

Which Countries Make Dramas



There are Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong, and Singaporean dramas. Other countries in Asia also make shows of similar format, even if they call it something else (e.g. Thai call theirs "lakorns.")

What is the running-time difference between dramas and Western TV shows



Unlike an American TV show which will run until the ratings suck, and thus can be anywhere between 2 and 2002 episodes (I am looking at you, soaps!), dramas have a fixed number of episodes from the start and thus a set storyline with a beginning, middle and end. While a very poorly performing in the ratings drama can have an ep or two lopped off its running time in Japan, Taiwan or Korea, and a wildly successful drama can have eps added on in Korea or Taiwan, overall, they will still end, and within reasonable time, no matter the ratings.

These extensions, tell me about them



Mainland Chinese dramas are exempt from extensions or ep order cutdowns as they are completely filmed by the time they air. If a Japanese drama does really poorly, it might get an ep or two cut down from the initial number (10 from 12 or similar). Japanese don't really extend their dramas, though very rarely, if a drama has been a huge hit, they might make a "Season 2", more equivalent to a British series, than anything. Taiwanese and Koreans almost never cut down the amount of eps, even if the ratings are abysmal (they have nothing to replace this drama with anyway) but if it's successful, they will sometimes order more episodes, a predetermined number. This is most common with Korea's period epic dramas, because they are already long and based on convoluted history, so there is room to maneuvre. No matter what though, these dramas will end. For example, Jumong, a Korea period epic ratings monster (at one point, more than half the country was watching it), got extended from 50 to 81 eps, but that was it, and it ended where it was going to end all along. Nor is there any Jumong2 in the works :)

When are they shown?



Daily dramas, so beloved of Korean housewives, are shown in the afternoon and early evening. However, most dramas you are likely to hear of and come across are weekly dramas (shown once a week in Taiwan and Japan, and twice a week in Korea) that play in the evening, sometimes later than you would think: Korea likes to show teen-oriented dramas, like Goong or Boys Before Flowers at 10pm!

A few quirks: Korean weekend dramas (i.e. those shown on Saturday and Sunday) often tend to deal with more adult subjects and have more sexual frankness (still not much :D) then their weekend counterparts. And Japan has late-night dramas (shown at midnight, 2am eg) which also allow more license, even if they are not necessarily mature or better.

How long are they



Korean daily dramas can rack up hundreds of episodes and each ep is about half-an-hour. While immensely popular inside Korea (if you look at Korean ratings, it's usually a daily drama that is number 1), they make poor exports and are almost never subtitled. Nor are the production values or actors anywhere near as "high class" as the weekly dramas. Basically, I doubt you will ever have a chance or will to watch one of those.

Weekly Korean dramas are a bit over an hour-long per episode, and the episode number varies greatly, from "special" dramas which might be only a couple of episodes long, to extra-long period dramas, which are seldom less than 30+ episodes and frequently run into 50+, 80+ or even 100+ episodes. Most Korean dramas, however, range anywhere between 16-24 episodes.

Japanese dramas are usually 45 or so minutes per episode (though the first episode is usually an hour), except for those odd late-night dramas which might be 30 minutes or so. There are "special" dramas which can be only a couple eps each, but most dramas range in episode number anywhere between 9-12, with 10-11 eps being most common (you are more likely to find 12 ep dramas in older days).

Taiwanese dramas range from 45 minutes to a bit over a hour per ep, and can be anywhere from 12 to 20+ eps. Sometimes there are execeptions (The Hospital was *gasp* 40 episodes), but that is unusual.

Mainland Chinese dramas and Hong Kong dramas I am somewhat less familiar with. The ones you are likely to find subbed are period dramas and are on the average about 45 minutes per episode, and range anywhere from 30+ to 40+ episodes, on the average.

I do not speak the native language, how good are my chances for English subtitles



It's fairly easy to find on-line or for purchase Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese and, to a markedly smaller degree, Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong dramas with English subtitles. I have yet to see Singapore dramas with subtitles and subs for Thai lakorns are also incredibly rare. I am not the person to ask about Vietnamese or Cambodian forms of TV entertainment, sorry!

What are the topics dramas cover



Asian dramas have topics that are even more broad in variety than American TV shows. We have everything from bubbly romances or angsty love stories, to period epics, out-and-out comedies, mysteries, thrillers, horror, sports dramas, or social stories. One of the reasons I love dramas are the endless variety.

Why should I watch them



A finite story, which will not leave you hanging when it either drags on or is cancelled just as things are getting good. Gorgeous men and women. Incredible cinematography and production values (especially for Korean dramas). Good story. Old-fashioned romance, swords, mafia men in suits, cross-dressing, students: i.e. anything that takes your fancy.

Further resources



http://www.yesasia.com is a good, if pricy, site to buy a lot of dramas with subtitles
http://www.soompi.com/forums is a Mecca for Korean entertainment
http://www.d-addicts.com is not only torrent central but a fun site for jdrama lovers
http://wiki.d-addicts.com a drama wikipedia
http://www.asianfanatics.net is where to go if you like Chinese/Taiwanese/HK entertainment

Where do I find dramas with subs:



http://dangermousie.livejournal.com/1023245.html
dangermousie: (Capital Scandal Secrets by miss_dian)
Chances are, if you've found this LJ, you are here because you already know and like dramas, my main subject of posting. But in case not, here is a quick and dirty primer.

What Are Dramas



Dramas (or "doramas") are Asia's answer to scripted TV shows, i.e. it's a term for TV shows from that part of the world. We in the US have Ugly Betty, Gossip Girl or the E.R. They have Pride, Save the Last Dance, or Mars. This term does not apply to reality shows, variety shows, or sitcoms (even though those are scripted too), btw.

Which Countries Make Dramas



There are Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong, and Singaporean dramas. Other countries in Asia also make shows of similar format, even if they call it something else (e.g. Thai call theirs "lakorns.")

What is the running-time difference between dramas and Western TV shows



Unlike an American TV show which will run until the ratings suck, and thus can be anywhere between 2 and 2002 episodes (I am looking at you, soaps!), dramas have a fixed number of episodes from the start and thus a set storyline with a beginning, middle and end. While a very poorly performing in the ratings drama can have an ep or two lopped off its running time in Japan, Taiwan or Korea, and a wildly successful drama can have eps added on in Korea or Taiwan, overall, they will still end, and within reasonable time, no matter the ratings.

These extensions, tell me about them



Mainland Chinese dramas are exempt from extensions or ep order cutdowns as they are completely filmed by the time they air. If a Japanese drama does really poorly, it might get an ep or two cut down from the initial number (10 from 12 or similar). Japanese don't really extend their dramas, though very rarely, if a drama has been a huge hit, they might make a "Season 2", more equivalent to a British series, than anything. Taiwanese and Koreans almost never cut down the amount of eps, even if the ratings are abysmal (they have nothing to replace this drama with anyway) but if it's successful, they will sometimes order more episodes, a predetermined number. This is most common with Korea's period epic dramas, because they are already long and based on convoluted history, so there is room to maneuvre. No matter what though, these dramas will end. For example, Jumong, a Korea period epic ratings monster (at one point, more than half the country was watching it), got extended from 50 to 81 eps, but that was it, and it ended where it was going to end all along. Nor is there any Jumong2 in the works :)

When are they shown?



Daily dramas, so beloved of Korean housewives, are shown in the afternoon and early evening. However, most dramas you are likely to hear of and come across are weekly dramas (shown once a week in Taiwan and Japan, and twice a week in Korea) that play in the evening, sometimes later than you would think: Korea likes to show teen-oriented dramas, like Goong or Boys Before Flowers at 10pm!

A few quirks: Korean weekend dramas (i.e. those shown on Saturday and Sunday) often tend to deal with more adult subjects and have more sexual frankness (still not much :D) then their weekend counterparts. And Japan has late-night dramas (shown at midnight, 2am eg) which also allow more license, even if they are not necessarily mature or better.

How long are they



Korean daily dramas can rack up hundreds of episodes and each ep is about half-an-hour. While immensely popular inside Korea (if you look at Korean ratings, it's usually a daily drama that is number 1), they make poor exports and are almost never subtitled. Nor are the production values or actors anywhere near as "high class" as the weekly dramas. Basically, I doubt you will ever have a chance or will to watch one of those.

Weekly Korean dramas are a bit over an hour-long per episode, and the episode number varies greatly, from "special" dramas which might be only a couple of episodes long, to extra-long period dramas, which are seldom less than 30+ episodes and frequently run into 50+, 80+ or even 100+ episodes. Most Korean dramas, however, range anywhere between 16-24 episodes.

Japanese dramas are usually 45 or so minutes per episode (though the first episode is usually an hour), except for those odd late-night dramas which might be 30 minutes or so. There are "special" dramas which can be only a couple eps each, but most dramas range in episode number anywhere between 9-12, with 10-11 eps being most common (you are more likely to find 12 ep dramas in older days).

Taiwanese dramas range from 45 minutes to a bit over a hour per ep, and can be anywhere from 12 to 20+ eps. Sometimes there are execeptions (The Hospital was *gasp* 40 episodes), but that is unusual.

Mainland Chinese dramas and Hong Kong dramas I am somewhat less familiar with. The ones you are likely to find subbed are period dramas and are on the average about 45 minutes per episode, and range anywhere from 30+ to 40+ episodes, on the average.

I do not speak the native language, how good are my chances for English subtitles



It's fairly easy to find on-line or for purchase Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese and, to a markedly smaller degree, Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong dramas with English subtitles. I have yet to see Singapore dramas with subtitles and subs for Thai lakorns are also incredibly rare. I am not the person to ask about Vietnamese or Cambodian forms of TV entertainment, sorry!

What are the topics dramas cover



Asian dramas have topics that are even more broad in variety than American TV shows. We have everything from bubbly romances or angsty love stories, to period epics, out-and-out comedies, mysteries, thrillers, horror, sports dramas, or social stories. One of the reasons I love dramas are the endless variety.

Why should I watch them



A finite story, which will not leave you hanging when it either drags on or is cancelled just as things are getting good. Gorgeous men and women. Incredible cinematography and production values (especially for Korean dramas). Good story. Old-fashioned romance, swords, mafia men in suits, cross-dressing, students: i.e. anything that takes your fancy.

Further resources



http://www.yesasia.com is a good, if pricy, site to buy a lot of dramas with subtitles
http://www.soompi.com/forums is a Mecca for Korean entertainment
http://www.d-addicts.com is not only torrent central but a fun site for jdrama lovers
http://wiki.d-addicts.com a drama wikipedia
http://www.asianfanatics.net is where to go if you like Chinese/Taiwanese/HK entertainment

Where do I find dramas with subs:



http://dangermousie.livejournal.com/1023245.html
dangermousie: (Capital Scandal Secrets by miss_dian)
Chances are, if you've found this LJ, you are here because you already know and like dramas, my main subject of posting. But in case not, here is a quick and dirty primer.

What Are Dramas



Dramas (or "doramas") are Asia's answer to scripted TV shows, i.e. it's a term for TV shows from that part of the world. We in the US have Ugly Betty, Gossip Girl or the E.R. They have Pride, Save the Last Dance, or Mars. This term does not apply to reality shows, variety shows, or sitcoms (even though those are scripted too), btw.

Which Countries Make Dramas



There are Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong, and Singaporean dramas. Other countries in Asia also make shows of similar format, even if they call it something else (e.g. Thai call theirs "lakorns.")

What is the running-time difference between dramas and Western TV shows



Unlike an American TV show which will run until the ratings suck, and thus can be anywhere between 2 and 2002 episodes (I am looking at you, soaps!), dramas have a fixed number of episodes from the start and thus a set storyline with a beginning, middle and end. While a very poorly performing in the ratings drama can have an ep or two lopped off its running time in Japan, Taiwan or Korea, and a wildly successful drama can have eps added on in Korea or Taiwan, overall, they will still end, and within reasonable time, no matter the ratings.

These extensions, tell me about them



Mainland Chinese dramas are exempt from extensions or ep order cutdowns as they are completely filmed by the time they air. If a Japanese drama does really poorly, it might get an ep or two cut down from the initial number (10 from 12 or similar). Japanese don't really extend their dramas, though very rarely, if a drama has been a huge hit, they might make a "Season 2", more equivalent to a British series, than anything. Taiwanese and Koreans almost never cut down the amount of eps, even if the ratings are abysmal (they have nothing to replace this drama with anyway) but if it's successful, they will sometimes order more episodes, a predetermined number. This is most common with Korea's period epic dramas, because they are already long and based on convoluted history, so there is room to maneuvre. No matter what though, these dramas will end. For example, Jumong, a Korea period epic ratings monster (at one point, more than half the country was watching it), got extended from 50 to 81 eps, but that was it, and it ended where it was going to end all along. Nor is there any Jumong2 in the works :)

When are they shown?



Daily dramas, so beloved of Korean housewives, are shown in the afternoon and early evening. However, most dramas you are likely to hear of and come across are weekly dramas (shown once a week in Taiwan and Japan, and twice a week in Korea) that play in the evening, sometimes later than you would think: Korea likes to show teen-oriented dramas, like Goong or Boys Before Flowers at 10pm!

A few quirks: Korean weekend dramas (i.e. those shown on Saturday and Sunday) often tend to deal with more adult subjects and have more sexual frankness (still not much :D) then their weekend counterparts. And Japan has late-night dramas (shown at midnight, 2am eg) which also allow more license, even if they are not necessarily mature or better.

How long are they



Korean daily dramas can rack up hundreds of episodes and each ep is about half-an-hour. While immensely popular inside Korea (if you look at Korean ratings, it's usually a daily drama that is number 1), they make poor exports and are almost never subtitled. Nor are the production values or actors anywhere near as "high class" as the weekly dramas. Basically, I doubt you will ever have a chance or will to watch one of those.

Weekly Korean dramas are a bit over an hour-long per episode, and the episode number varies greatly, from "special" dramas which might be only a couple of episodes long, to extra-long period dramas, which are seldom less than 30+ episodes and frequently run into 50+, 80+ or even 100+ episodes. Most Korean dramas, however, range anywhere between 16-24 episodes.

Japanese dramas are usually 45 or so minutes per episode (though the first episode is usually an hour), except for those odd late-night dramas which might be 30 minutes or so. There are "special" dramas which can be only a couple eps each, but most dramas range in episode number anywhere between 9-12, with 10-11 eps being most common (you are more likely to find 12 ep dramas in older days).

Taiwanese dramas range from 45 minutes to a bit over a hour per ep, and can be anywhere from 12 to 20+ eps. Sometimes there are execeptions (The Hospital was *gasp* 40 episodes), but that is unusual.

Mainland Chinese dramas and Hong Kong dramas I am somewhat less familiar with. The ones you are likely to find subbed are period dramas and are on the average about 45 minutes per episode, and range anywhere from 30+ to 40+ episodes, on the average.

I do not speak the native language, how good are my chances for English subtitles



It's fairly easy to find on-line or for purchase Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese and, to a markedly smaller degree, Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong dramas with English subtitles. I have yet to see Singapore dramas with subtitles and subs for Thai lakorns are also incredibly rare. I am not the person to ask about Vietnamese or Cambodian forms of TV entertainment, sorry!

What are the topics dramas cover



Asian dramas have topics that are even more broad in variety than American TV shows. We have everything from bubbly romances or angsty love stories, to period epics, out-and-out comedies, mysteries, thrillers, horror, sports dramas, or social stories. One of the reasons I love dramas are the endless variety.

Why should I watch them



A finite story, which will not leave you hanging when it either drags on or is cancelled just as things are getting good. Gorgeous men and women. Incredible cinematography and production values (especially for Korean dramas). Good story. Old-fashioned romance, swords, mafia men in suits, cross-dressing, students: i.e. anything that takes your fancy.

Further resources



http://www.yesasia.com is a good, if pricy, site to buy a lot of dramas with subtitles
http://www.soompi.com/forums is a Mecca for Korean entertainment
http://www.d-addicts.com is not only torrent central but a fun site for jdrama lovers
http://wiki.d-addicts.com a drama wikipedia
http://www.asianfanatics.net is where to go if you like Chinese/Taiwanese/HK entertainment

Where do I find dramas with subs:



http://dangermousie.livejournal.com/1023245.html

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